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BigBird

Maytag Transmission Rebuild, Washer (LAT8234AAE)

31 posts in this topic

Hi,

I am a Sophomore at my local University here in New Mexico. Last week, my other washing machine smoked its motor. I am not interested in repairing that machine. Last Summer, I found a Maytag washer next to a dumpster. I added a spring from Ace Hardware to the motor bracket to hold what looked like a automotive belt tight on the pulleys. The unit operated well, except for that the tub would not spin. I turned the input shaft both ways, and observed the motor reversing, but the output shaft only agitates.

What could be the problem with the transmission? I looked at the exploded view, and couldn’t figure out how it worked.

Thanks,

Big Bird

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

K (Cool) Dog,

Ok, I read those posts and followed the arguments throughly. Let me rephrase them here:

Argument 1:

Premise: " I thought that the tub bearing needed to be replaced and so I spent $150"

Conclusion: "I wasted my money because the tub bearing was not the problem."

Argument 2:

Premise: "I thought a standard automotive belt would work fine"

Conclusion: "I was wrong and replacing the belts fixed the motor cut out on spin"

My motor does not squeal at any time, and it just agitates. The motor reverses and the tub drains fine, but the machine continues to agitate until the end of the cycle.

So, in conclusion, the tub bearing is not defective because the machine does not grind, squeal or shut off; and the automotive belts should be replaced, but there is another problem that must be resolved first.

Any ideas?

Thanks,

Big Bird

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Ok,

I removed the tubs and belts.

I see that it is the CASE of the transmission that rotates in the spin cycle. Correct?

The brake is not being released. The transmission case does not rotate no matter which direction I turn the pulley. At this point, I feel that the transmission might be OK.

What could be the problem?

Thanks,

Big Bird

washershell.jpg

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Hi,

I removed the pulley in order to continue to the transmission dismounting.

I found damage to the helical drive threads. This damage is preventing the pulley from traveling upwards and disengaging the brake.

Do you think there could be other issues that would prevent the motor from spinning the transmission case?

Thanks,

Big Bird

washerpulley.jpg

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Nice Photo's !!

Check the bearing above the Brake

00559730.jpg

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The transmission could be locked up.....might be where the damage came from. I suggest finding a used pulley and giving it a shot. If that the only problem then you will have a great machine now that you have replaced the tub bearing and seal.

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Kool Dog,

I missed 5pm for the parts shop. I know I need buy the brake tool, and might have more luck tapping it with the hammer.

Right now I’m using my largest Channellocks and they have a great grip, but even counter-holding the transmission case with my hand it is resisting me.

I removed the locking clip.

Is this correct?

Big Bird

brakeclip.jpg

brakeremoval.jpg

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yep, your doing it right, but its almost impossible to do it without the tool...usually have to beat the daylights out of it to knock it loose....

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It's also a whole lot easier to do with the upper component's still attached, I'll normally pull the Brake before removing tub if stripping down.

The wrench is a MUST though, you might be able to wrap a belt tightly around trans to get a good reef on 'er (get a helper)

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Hi,

Because the appliance parts store had no stock of the ‘‘Brake Removal Tool’’ which Maytag no longer makes (which is not to say that other companies do not make them), I decided to purchase a Maytew 5/16 Long Taper Drift, and a 3LB Engineer Hammer. The tools worked very well to rotate the Brake counterclockwise from the Tub Brace. I used oil to help reduce the friction of the threadings, and reduce the force required for removal.

I’m very satisfied with the serviceability of the SKF 6206 Brake Bearing, and don’t feel like buying a new one at Motion Industries for $20.

The transmission operates smoothly and so I will not be overhauling the unit. The splines of the brake and transmission case also appear intact, and should drive the tub nicely.

I will order the Drive Pulley on Monday, and report back upon assembly.

Big Bird

%C3%96l.jpg

Austreiberbenutzen.jpg

Bremsenabbauen.jpg

brakedrift.jpg

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Very nice pictorial coverage of your progress, looks like another Merit Apprenticeship well in the making, the Brake may be stuck on you and may need some oil or disassembly to free it up

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Kdog,

I think you may be right. The clutch may be jammed in travel and this may have overloaded the pulley, cracking the drive threads.

I’ll check it out after I finish studying. I have two midterms next week.

Big Bird

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We'll be here

:bigcoffee:

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Very nice pictorial coverage of your progress, looks like another Merit Apprenticeship well in the making

Very nice indeed!

Regardless of the outcome of your washer, BigBird, congratulations on your appointment to Merit Apprentice Appliantologist! mgpimbgr.gif

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Welcome Aboard BigBird !

:argue:

Edited by kdog

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Congratulations Big Bird on your promotion! I’m a little jealous .

You got in with your skill. :thumbsup:

I got in by acting big and talk’n rich. :dude:

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Thanks!

I feel flattered. :).

Now I just need to feel clean socks ;)

Big Bird

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Ok,

Spring break is here!!! YES!

Now I’ve a chance to work on the washer. I have been reading many interesting posts in between study breaks on this board. The problems here are quite interesting. I felt though, the thread today about the ‘‘Nobody views my post’’, and ‘‘The other forum gave me more help’’, was not really very polite. I’m glad I can‘t find it anymore.

Anyway, I ordered some parts. I got seals and other nice things like a new clutch and pulley. It may be so, that I will rebuild the transmission. The tub still doesn’t spin, and the brake is not released. The pulley rotates up the shaft, but the transmission gives little resistance, and so the brake is not released. Maybe those little clutch washers have failed? I’m not really sure.

I scored a new brake bearing after all. SKF Explorer class, and a pretty new one. There was quite a bit of wind, and since I left the parts outside, the bearings had dirt in them, and didn’t rotate freely. That was enough of a reason to replace the sealed bearing, as it made a crunching sound. Sealed Ball Bearing SKF 6206 2Z.

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/bearingbox.jpg

Applying simple hand force with my palm, I installed the bearing into the brake with the markings facing outwards. Using the 5/16 drift, I tightened the brake into the tub brace. It doesn’t take very much force, and I used the 16 Oz ball peen hammer. I then installed the locking clip using a 7/16’’ socket.

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/brakebearing.jpg

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/Bremseinstallieren.jpg

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/Bremseanziehen.jpg

Focusing now on the transmission. I used light ketone to remove the grease and clean the shaft splines.

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/ketone.jpg

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/Keilwelle.jpg

I had some Mobil 1 Synthetic Chassis Grease leftover from my previous bearing work, and so I used some on the shaft splines.

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/schmieren.jpg

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/abgeschmiertkeilwelle.jpg

The next step was to service the release bearing. It was pretty filthy from rolling around outside. Then was the time to use the halogenated solvent. The tetrachloroethylene sold as brake cleaner, removed all grease and particles from the assembly. It will also remove the neurons from your brain, so I wore a charcoal respirator.

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/Dreck.jpg

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/Saubereskugellager.jpg

Then, I packed the bearing through, using my palm to force the grease inside the bearing, and installed it onto the pulley.

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/Kugelinstallieren.jpg

I tied up the loose ends and installed the belts, but as I said earlier, the unit does not spin. :*(

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/Riemenscheibe.jpg

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/schrauben.jpg

I’ll report back in a day or so. I need to finish my other transmission rebuild, before I start another project....

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/Getreibe.jpg

Big Bird

Edited by BigBird

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Excellent work BigBird ! keep us posted, and note that there is more grey matter in my brain than neurons - lol

Is that a Muncie 4 speed in your last pic ?

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KDog,

Naw, the transmission is for my 77’ Volvo. It burns ethanol now with the new Bosch EV6 injector design. I want the lighter 4 speed for the increased fuel economy, as opposed to the current gearbox with the heavy english overdrive unit.

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/volvo.jpg

I’ll try to post on the Maytag tomorrow night.

Oh, and sorry about the German file names. When I made the post, I didn’t know that I could only post 10 pictures at a time.

Big Bird

Edited by BigBird

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Hi,

I finished the Volvo transmission this evening. It gave me a chance to check out the Maytag unit.

I found the most difficult part was to remove the cover! I removed the screws and using a plastic bag to catch the oil, I knocked the glued cover loose using the long drift. It took a few knocks, but gently working around the entire cover it ajared and the thick oil poured out.

coverscrew.jpg

drift.jpg

The oil had the smell of gear lubricant and had the consistency of Lucas Oil Additive. I would have saved and reused it, had the oil not been contaminated with particulates. I also try never to reuse lubricants, unless there is a special circumstance.

oil.jpg

drained.jpg

The next step is to remove the spring clip which retains the output shaft. I used some waterpump pliers and it came free very easily. I then withdrew the shaft from the housing.

clipgrab.jpg

clipfree.jpg

outputshaftpull.jpg

At this point a clue was revealed. At the time, I did not know that it was the collar locking pin which had been severed.

clue.jpg

I sought to remove the locking collar to remove the input shaft. I then found the broken pin.

brokencollarpin.jpg

The next step was to withdraw the input shaft, once the pinhead was removed. Since the collar was free to travel, I knew that it should slide free without damage. It required the use of the waterpump pliers to grasp the rag covered shaft with one hand, and the plastic mallet to hit the plier body in the other. This knocked the shaft free. I then removed the pinion and collar.

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/shaftgrab.jpg

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/shaftwithdrawn.jpg

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/collarandpinion.jpg

The next step was to remove the clutch. Pretty easy compared to the Volvo. I just prised it away from the casting with a flat tool.

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/clutch1.jpg

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/clutch2.jpg

I then pushed the rest of the collar pin out of the input shaft. It was not tight, and required only hand force. A good thing, as I broke the correct pin punch on an earlier job.

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/pinpress.jpg

Since I finished my Volvo transmission, it freed up the plastic Tote. I HIGHLY recommend buying a plastic Tote for any mechanical project. The plastic is leak-proof, and it lends a nice catch for any small parts. You can then fit the lid to be stored and worked again at a later date, without rust, dust, or loss.

http://www.unm.edu/~goatman/washer/tote.jpg

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Ok,

I ordered a new clutch and pinion, as well as an input shaft seal. I am going to try to source a 3/16 spring pin to fasten the collar onto the input shaft. The original part is 14 days to ship. I've seen packs of 100 spring pins locally, but no real luck so far. It's been hard to concentrate with 3 critical nuclear reactors downwind of the US. I hope it doesn't come down to wearing masks around town. The LD50 of Plutonium is 1/1000000000 gram. (Tagesschau.de, morgensendung)

Anyway, I had a question about the transmission oil. Is there any substitute?

Do I need to oil the new tub bushing, or is it the type with embedded lubricant?

Big Bird

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