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jermitts

Whirlpool EL7ATRRMS03 L1

12 posts in this topic

Well, I wrote a long and beautiful post, and then it didn't post. I don't know where it went.

To the point. The fan is running, the coils are clean. The defrost timer is nearly brand new, and I ran it for two hours with the timer unplugged and timer-plug jumped to make the compressor run for sure. The compressor is making a weird noise since last night. I can't measure amps on the start/run because of the weird way they connect to the relay. Not sure if there is an easy way to test the relay. Hoping it's a relay or the capacitor. start/run windings are 9.7 and 7.5 ohms. Is this worth ordering a new relay and/or capacitor or should I just call the big-dollar man to replace the compressor?

Other stuff I left out- the weird noise sounds like the noise it makes for a bit while it starts, but it's making it all the time, but it isn't doing a run-click. I did short cycle it once today by accident and it did a proper run-click, but it cleared itself and started up again and went back to making the weird noise.

Thanks to all gurus.

Jeremy

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

post video to YouTube ?

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well, I don't know if this will help at all, but I did it.

The noise isn't real clear, but it usually isn't even noticeable in the kitchen, and when I first heard it I was in the next room.

So, it occurs to me today that I actually might have a known-good start relay and capacitor, in the freezer duh...

I opened her up and the relay is the same. The capacitor is 15uF instead of 10uF though-- the compressors are different. (I'd always assumed they just put a different thermostat in it)

I'm testing the fridge with the freezer start relay in there now, will update...

Oh yeah... The long and beautiful post didn't post. In it, I had mentioned that this is a full-fridge, and it sits next to its full freezer. The house was built around them. They look like a baby sub zero, but they are just two matching units with pretty stainless steel fronts.

That's the long and the short of it. (marriage explanation...) I bet you were wondering how I got a start relay from the freezer to put on the fridge eh? :)

Jeremy

Edited by jermitts

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Well, the other start relay might change the sound, but I'm trying not to short-cycle it, so it's difficult to tell. It seems like a higher-pitched whine with the original one in there. It seems quieter with the freezer relay installed. But that might be in my head, because after an hour I've still got no cold and no frost at all on the coils.

I'm not really an electronics guy, I understand the basics of voltage and power and resistance and how capacitors do what they do (and I'm a wiz at the last 5 versions of the NEC!) but I don't know the ramifications of swapping a 10uF cap for a 15 on a lil' freon compressor. Magic smoke? I know that sometimes when an AC motor is having trouble starting and replacing the capacitor didn't fix it (old age or windings wearing or bushings failing or whatever really is going on) we've increased the capacitor size a bit to give it a little more help and no damage was done, get a few more months or years out of the thing, but considering the size of those motors and the size of this one, I'm not sure the logic translates.

One more thing, the capacitor at Repair Clinic for this model shows 12uF in the picture. Is that okay? I swear this one came with one that is marked 10uF. $50! Wow!

Thanks again,

Jeremy

*-PS it looks like there's one of these sidekick fridges for sale about 10 hours from me. Maybe a road trip this weekend? :)

Edited by jermitts

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... because after an hour I've still got no cold and no frost at all on the coils.

... sidekick fridges for sale about 10 hours from me. Maybe a road trip this weekend? :)

1) if the Compressor is running for an hour and "no frost", then it seems like a system problem $ $

2) maybe

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Yes, you may have a leak and the compressor sound has changed as it has no gas to pump, like putting your hand over the end of a vacuum hose changes the sound of the motor. The capacitors that you are referring to have nothing to do with the starting of the compressors - they are run capacitors wired across the 2 motor windings to decrease the power factor of the motor while running, they almost NEVER fail - you can measure the current draw of the compressor by clamping the power lead to the compressor, if it's extremely low - you may indeed have a system leak and it may be time for a "divorce".

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... like putting your hand over the end of a vacuum hose changes the sound of the motor.

trivia fact.. when you put you hand over the Vaccuum cleaner Hose, and the Motor revs higher..

it actually has less of a load and the amperage decreases ..

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Yup - just like a compressor with no refrigerant ..............

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Well, just a final update. I tried to call a local 'little guy' shop, and all I got were indecipherable answering machines and busy signals and no-answerers. So I called the local maytag folk, and they said the compressor is $302 and they'll change it out for $300. I said "what if it turns out to be leaking out somewhere else?" (I know, rare, but it happens, yeah?) and she said that I can take it to them, they will do a $59 diagnostic check which includes leak location, and then they'll apply the $59 to any repair they do.

That just sounds too good to pass up (and the nearest matching one is $600 and a 10-hour drive and $350 in gas or $300 to ship!) so we're gonna take it in on Monday, if tha loard willin and the creik dont rise.

Thanks for the guidance, as always.

Jeremy

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"what if it turns out to be leaking out somewhere else?" (I know, rare, but it happens, yeah?)

Actually, that's quite likely what has happened - the leak is likely at a welded joint or corroded area of the tubing, or in the aluminum evaporator coil (such as where the defrost switch is clipped), your compressor may still be ok - although it's replacement is always recommended since the compressor has run full of air/humidity.

Look at the tubing carefully and you might see some tell-tale signs of oil around the leak area

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So you're sayin' it might take an evaporator coil and a compressor? ugh. How bad is is running "full of air and humidity"? don't they make a little inline dryer we could weld in there and call it good??

I keep reminding myself that I only gave $1400 for both halves of this. MSRP was about $3200, but I doubt anyone ever paid that for them.

Jeremy

(here's generic pics)

4qrrbk.jpg(imagine them without this gap here!)4qrrhn.jpg

Edited by jermitts

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I done many heatexchanger/Evap Assemblys on these maytag/whrilpool design. I tend to find the leak on heatexchanger by stripping insulation on it at back. Also on evap where copper meets aulminum

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