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      Webinar Recordings Index Page   10/03/2017

      On-demand appliance repair training videos for Professional Appliantologist members Over 30 hours (and growing!) of original, high quality appliance training webinars developed and given by yours truly are at your fingertips, on topics you won't find anywhere else. Fill in those knowledge gaps, strengthen those areas of uncertainty, and boost your skills. Watch on mobile or desktop at your convenience whenever, wherever.  Ultra Short Primer on Basic Electricity, Circuits, Ohm's Law, and Schematic Reading (Length: 1:04:48) Basic Refrigerator Troubleshooting (Length: 1:10:45) Schematic Reading Workshop, 10/2015 (Length 1:19:08) Troubleshooting Strategies for Computer-Controlled Appliances (Length: 48:34) Semiconductors and PN Junctions (Length: 1:04:37) Appliance Temperature Sensing Devices & Technology (Length: 1:27:33) Voltage Measurements, Meters, Ghost Voltages, and Triac-controlled Neutrals (Length: 1:29:32) Troubleshooting with Tech Sheets, Part 1, 4/2016 (Length: 1:09:26) Troubleshooting with Tech Sheets, Part 2, 4/2016 (Length: 1:21:11) Tech Sheet Review, 4/9/2016: Bosch Speed Cooker, Amana Refrigerator, GE Glass Cooktop Range (Length: 1:22:58) Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) Switches used in Samsung Switched Mode Power Supplies (SMPS) (Length: 27:07) PWM Computer Cooling Fan in a Whirlpool Refrigerator (Length: 14:53) Understanding AC Split-phase Household Power Supplies (Length: 52:41) Troubleshooting a Samsung Electric Dryer without Disassembly using Live Tests and the Schematic (Length: 22:47) Troubleshooting a Bosch Dishwasher No-Heat Problem using the Schematic and Live Tests (Length: 15:38) Linear Motors and Linear Compressors (Length: 55:54) Bi-directional PSC Drive Motor Systems in Whirlpool VM Washers (Length: 56:52) Appliance Service Call Structure and Troubleshooting Strategies (Length: 1:00:16) The Ten Step Troubleshooting Tango and Workshop Exercises (Length: 1:35:39) Troubleshooting Ten-Step Tango Advanced Workshop (Length: 1:32:06) Ten-Step Tango Troubleshooting Workshop: Refrigerators (Length: 1:35:57) Whirlpool Duet Washer Schematic Analysis & Whirlpool Dryer Moisture Sensor System (Length: 1:03:04) Neutral Vs. Ground, Inverter Microwave, Digital Communications, Loading Down in DC loads, and more! (Length: 1:14:45) Gas Oven Service Call After a Parts Changing Monkey (Length: 36:04) AFCI and GFCI Circuit Protection Technology (Length: 41:26) Troubleshooting Samsung Refrigerators and more (Length: 1:29:58) 3-way Valves and Dual Evaporator Refrigerators (Length: 1:15:45) Split-Phase Compressors and PTC Start Devices (Length: 1:11:57) Gas Dryer Ignition Systems (Length: 53:50) Refrigerator Sealed System Thermodynamics, Part 1 (Length: 43:07) Refrigerator Sealed System Thermodynamics, Part 2 (Length 1:09:09) To access these webinars and all the other info-goodies here at Appliantology, become a Professional Appliantologist today. If you need cost-effective, time-flexible, state-of-the-art appliance technical training, check out the Master Samurai Tech Academy.
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      [Webinar] Samurai's Sealed System Sleuthing Secrets - 10/30/2017 @7PM ET   10/19/2017

      Having laid some theoretical groundwork in the last webinar, we're going to focus on practical considerations in this one. That means quick n’ dirty techniques for diagnosing sealed system problem using strategically chosen and skillfully interpreted temperature measurements.  Review homework from the first session on 10-2-2017. Home refrigerator practical design and operating rules-of-thumb useful for troubleshooting Practical application exercises Troubleshooting scenario exercise Techniques for making system temperature measurements for determining superheat and subcooling Sealed system diagnosis homework assignment (to be reviewed in the next webinar in this series) If you attended the first webinar in this series, this is your payday! We’re going to apply that keen, penetrating insight you now possess into money- and time-saving shortcuts you can use to diagnose real-world refrigeration systems on service calls. See this calendar event for more details                   
hawgwildtours

AMANA GUID090EA50

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hawgwildtours

This furnace led blinks continuously and the the burner lights but goes right back out. My friend changed the flame sensor but no help. Any ideas beside main board????thanks in advance

Edited by hawgwildtours

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RegUS_PatOff

This furnace led blinks continuously ...

continuously, ?

OR repeats a certain number of flashes ?

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hawgwildtours

I was wondering the same thing. I will go by his house tonight and see

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hawgwildtours

I just called him and he says it is continuos

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applianceman18007260692

Continuous flashing on the LED might mean your furnace has a reversed polarity of 115 volts. Turn off the power and correct the wiring polarity after reviewing the wiring diagram

Edited by applianceman18007260692
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Bobice

AMANA & GOODMAN FAULT CODES

1. One led flash that stays on continuously = No signal from thermostat. Turn off power and check connections.

2. One led that flashes = Furnace lockout after three attempts to fire. Must be reset by lowering it for twenty seconds and then raise it back. After one hour furnace will reset itself.

3. Two led flashes = Draft Inducer not working or shorted or failed pressure switch.

4. Three led flashes = Open pressure switch.

5. Four led flashes = open primary limit switch due to faulty wiring or bad filters.

6. Five led flashes = Sensing flame without a call for heat due to possible slow closing valve.

7. Seven led flashes = faulty flame sensor

8. Eight led flashes = faulty igniter

9. Continuous led flashing = Reverse polarity. Check wiring diagram

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hawgwildtours

My friend had changed the igniter instead of the sensor. I cleaned the sensor and all is well. As for the blinking light this furnance was wired with 2 thermostats for a two story house and they used two boards. There was a green led on the add on board but it was saying normal operation. Main board did not have power to it until downstairs called for heat. Thanks again for all help

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jb8103

My friend had changed the igniter instead of the sensor. I cleaned the sensor and all is well. As for the blinking light this furnance was wired with 2 thermostats for a two story house and they used two boards. There was a green led on the add on board but it was saying normal operation. Main board did not have power to it until downstairs called for heat. Thanks again for all help

Two boards for one furnace? Never seen that before.

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Shootist

When getting a flame sensor error always make sure the furnace is properly grounded before you do anything else. An ungrounded furnace will pull a little ground off of the gas line but this is not a good ground source and the furnace will work when it feels like it and drive you up a wall. If the ground is good then cleaning the sensor rod with a little steel wool or fine grit sandpaper will usually fix it.

I had a customer once that had a heater problem. Every fall their previous A/C guy had to come out and replace the flame sensor. This went on for years and finally they got fed up and called me instead. I knew right away the problem once I saw the old 2-prong socket in the attic. Luckily the water heater was close by so I ran a new ground wire to a ground clamp on the cold water line and the furnace fired right up. The following fall I got a "thank you" card from this customer because it was the first time in years the furnace worked right the first cold spell.

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michla

I know this might be a little late coming, but I had the same problem with your model last Spring. A closer look revealed a pressure switch (round diagpham cannister looking thing with small hose attached to it) that was tripping off prematurely. The Draft Induced Blower (first thing to start in the forced air heating cycle, purges exhaust gases to exterior) has a purpose-built hose nipple to send positive air pressure down that small hose via the spinning fan in the DIB....be it ever so small CFM of air movement.

Problem is, if anything is compromised in that small air signal to the pressure switch, the diaphram plunger pintle will not extend far enough to comletely and consistently trip (close the contacts) in the lever microswitch (mounted on one side of the pressure swith pot) to send the signal the controller (LED box) wants to see. Any interruption/failure in the pressure switch tells the Controller the Draft Induced Blower is not running (even if it is) --which is an UNSAFE condition and the entire heating cycle process comes to an abrupt halt.

So, what you've got is a weak air signal to the pressure switch, which can be caused by:

--ruptured/torn rubber hose from DIB to Pressure Switch

--tired DIB spinning at lower rpm's creating less air movement than needed

--an "air leak" somewhere in the intake/exhaust manifolds for the DIB

--a faulty and/or leaking pressure switch

I finally found a new DIB on Ebay (they're very expensive) for my Amana just like yours, but that still didn't cure the problems like you're experiencing. It wasn't until I played with bending the microswitch metal mounting tab on the pressure switch that I could affect a changed relationship of the air signal/pintle engagement at the microswitch that made the big difference. It was very tricky positioning that arc of bend in the tab just right, but after much patience and testing, I finally got it right. You have to be very careful though by bending the tab only micro-inches at a time in your trial-and-error process---too much bend and the furnance cycle gets befuddled by the sequence of the switch contact cycle.

Just don't let any appliance parts salesmen talk you into buying one of those "Adjustable Pressure Switches" if you decide to replace yours instead (it may still need tweaking anyway). The adjustables are not only junk, they never operate consistently and will confuse your furnace even more! I know...I tried one.

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