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Patricio

Normal flucuations in voltage?

7 posts in this topic

My house voltage flucuates at main breaker anywhere from 116V to 122V at any given time. This is coming into breaker box from utility company. We change out burned light bulbs more often than I think we should. Is this normal voltage fluxuation, should I contact power company?

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

that doesn't seem excessive to me .. and wouldn't burn out light bulbs,

unless there were higher voltage spikes,

but then you would definitely see the sudden increase in bulb brightness.

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Must be the quality of bulbs my wife buys. Dollar General you know. :whistling:

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yes dollar bulbs do not last

in my home we have dimmers on everything , even in the bathrooms . light bulbs last around 6 years on dimmer

started using dollar store bulbs and was getting less than a year on them

now back to good bulbs and back to years and years per bulb

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I was taught that AC power can fluctuate as much as 10 percent and is acceptable

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I've never understood why some literature refer to a single leg as 120v & others refer to elec supply as 110v. I've been in some houses as low as 107v supply, & others never higher than 123v.

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I've never understood why some literature refer to a single leg as 120v

that's average ...

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