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suemarian

Finished with KitchenAid

70 posts in this topic

..... more failures = more money

 

where would we all be if it lasted forever ?

Right on....man I really love the ADC technology in fridges. .. ADC standing for All Day Cha-ching!

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

Where I'm at we have 3 big power plants, each an hour away, and one little co op.  The co op serves a majority of the high end homes, cabins, etc.  I know that a mechanical timer in anything can take more beatings from power surges than an electronic board. Both are going to fail at sometime.  I can tell you there's a lot of boards that fail before they finish being manufactured and are reworked.  But with energy efficiency wanted by the government and bells/whistles wanted by consumers then we get job security.....

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<<<USA consumers are so lazy, they don't want to hurt their hands turning a timer dial.>>>

 

*********************

 

Which study are you referring to?

 

**********************

 

<<<Maybe all the manufacturers need to go back to mechanical timers and say the hell with the electronic control boards.  That won't happen anytime soon>>>

 

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Why haven't the manufacturers said: "The Hell with Electronic Control Boards" ?

 

Enlighten us with your infinite wisdom on such matters...

 

Hey, I need SOMETHING to tell my customers when they complain that their appliance is only 2 years old or just out of warranty and already it needs a repair, and then they go on and say my old washer, dishwasher etc. lasted 20 years without a repair, bla bla bla.  I try to let those complaints go in one ear and out the other, but sometimes it gets annoying listening to the same old broken record, especially after I have done this job for 20 years.

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My reply is 'since there has been appliances, there's been appliance repairmen. They all break sometime - always have and always will.'

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Hey, I need SOMETHING to tell my customers when they complain that their appliance is only 2 years old or just out of warranty and already it needs a repair, and then they go on and say my old washer, dishwasher etc. lasted 20 years without a repair, bla bla bla. I try to let those complaints go in one ear and out the other, but sometimes it gets annoying listening to the same old broken record, especially after I have done this job for 20 years.

Understand then empathize. Great sales tools. Making a point, not so much ie "So your older washer lasted quite a while, huh? Having a durable appliance is really a good thing, isn't it? That'll be $350. Have a nice day."

Edited by DurhamAppliance

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<<<Maybe all the manufacturers need to go back to mechanical timers and say the hell with the electronic control boards.  That won't happen anytime soon, USA consumers are so lazy, they don't want to hurt their hands turning a timer dial.>>>


 

<<<Hey, I need SOMETHING to tell my customers when they complain that their appliance is only 2 years old or just out of warranty and already it needs a repair, and then they go on and say my old washer, dishwasher etc. lasted 20 years without a repair, bla bla bla.  I try to let those complaints go in one ear and out the other, but sometimes it gets annoying listening to the same old broken record, especially after I have done this job for 20 years.>>>

 

<<<Having a durable appliance is really a good thing, isn't it? That'll be $350. Have a nice day.">>>

 

*******************************

 

Seriously?

 

I've been in business over 30 years---and I LOVE my job. I LOVE interacting with my customers.

Striving to be the best-of-the-best always has been and always will be my goal.

Winning awards and accolades is par-for-the-course---a natural for me.

If one of my customers ever complained about me (disparaging remarks/cavalier cynicism)---I'd take that very much to heart.

I've *always* conveyed a positive attitude in a customers home---including personal conduct and in describing the state-of-things in the appliance industry---such as government energy mandates etc.

Customers appreciate being educated on those topics that we service technicians are so familiar with---*without* the condescending remarks/unprofessional attitude.

If you talk to customers the same as  you're doing so here---that's suicide.

A death-of-a-thousand-cuts.

It will not earn you repeat business/quality of service awards/A+ ratings on angieslist.com etc.

 

Now---if all this cynical commentary is for the purpose of entertaining us---off-the-cuff on the forum---that's fine.

 

If not---then if you guys are going to the ASTI convention in Orlando---there's a class on Friday March 08 (1:30pm to 3:00pm)

titled:

 

"TECHNICIAN CUSTOMER SERVICE SKILLS"

 

"There's a right way and wrong way to approach customers"

 

I'd strongly recommend it :)


 

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I don't need to be lectured, but it does get annoying listening to customers complain about how the old appliances lasted so much longer than the new high tech, state of the art appliances.   I bite my tongue and  I DO keep a positive attitude and  explain to the customers about how  the new appliances have to meet the energy efficiency standards that the old ones did not and all the features the new appliances have versus the old ones.

 

Sorry, John, I think you missed your calling.  You should have been a teacher. I love how you patted yourself on your back.

 

 

WHY are you always picking on me and critiquing what I say?

Edited by Scottthewolf

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Respecting others opinion is professionalism at its best. Sometimes not challenging a customer's negative opinion about your favorite machine neither reflects your enjoyment of what you do nor your expertise in doing it. When you take a customers disparaging comment to heart, you risk losing your objectivity.

Customers, after battling a machine for a length of time, can also developed heartfelt feelings. I, for one, am not a washer-customer social worker nor appliance relationship counselor. Others may elect to be such. I will, however, repair their machine and educate them about it. If the customer still feels his machine is a piece of crap, so be it. I'm not a believer in the maxim "a customer is always right" , but I do subscribe to a principle found in How to Win Friends and Influence People, one of the best books on sales techniques ever written. That principle suggests when dealing with people, many times it's best not to be right...even when you are.

Edited by DurhamAppliance

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<<<Respecting others opinion is professionalism at its best. Sometimes not challenging a customer's negative opinion about your favorite machine neither reflects your enjoyment of what you do nor your expertise in doing it. When you take a customers disparaging comment to heart, you risk losing your objectivity.>>>

******************

 

You're addressing this to Scott, I presume?

 


 

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<<<Respecting others opinion is professionalism at its best. Sometimes not challenging a customer's negative opinion about your favorite machine neither reflects your enjoyment of what you do nor your expertise in doing it. When you take a customers disparaging comment to heart, you risk losing your objectivity.>>>

******************

 

You're addressing this to Scott, I presume?

 

 

It is simply an opinion. It serves no good or useful purpose to say to whom it was addressed. if, in fact, it was addressed to any one or more particular person or persons.

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Good answer Durham!

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It is simply an opinion. It serves no good or useful purpose to say to whom it was addressed. if, in fact, it was addressed to any one or more particular person or persons.

 

 

You been studying Law in your spare time ?

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Getting back to the board and timer failures. Just build better electronic boards and timers. Working on cnc machines for years the boards rarely failed in some pretty nasty environments.

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What's a 'cnc machine'?

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What's a 'cnc machine'?

Computer Numerical Control

such as an industrial milling machine

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 Sorry Strathy, I did not see your question, but Reg answered it. A (CNC) Computerized numerically controlled machine is any machine that has a computer which is programmed to do various tasks, cutting, drilling, any kind of machining or woodworking usually on an industrial scale. They are programmed to cut in xyz axes.

 I am fairly new to appliance repair. (2years this month)(had to get out of the factory before I lost my soul) but always repaired my own and friends appliances. I forget when I use acronyms from my old profession that I should be more clear. I see acronyms on here (this website) pertaining to appliances and do not know what they stand for, but figure if I read enough posts I'll figure it out.  

 Anyway this website keeps me learning with a plethora of info.. I don't know how all of you find the time to read through all this stuff though.

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lol - cool.  Welcome to the fraternity brotha.  Don't be afraid to ask what the acronyms mean when we use them here!  I still see ones I don't exactly know what they mean and I've been at this for 22 yrs.  lol.   

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Thanks for the welcome. Sometimes all the different machines are overwhelming. I just take them one at a time.

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BTW, in welding, what does MIG and TIG mean?

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GMAC. Gas metal arc welding. MIG. Metal inert gas. TIG. Tungsten inert gas. Gas used to sheild the arc from impurities.

 

What is BTW? Just kidding.

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