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208V For 240V Dryers

14 posts in this topic

Went to an apartment complex today. Complaint was all dryers (front load LGs and Samsungs) take too long to dry clothes (4 units) and two that don't heat at all. Confirmed that voltage to outlets was 208 (units rated at 240v). Two units that didn't heat at all had burned out elements. I am thinking that the 208, at reduced power watts, causes customers to run dryers extra long--hence premature wear. The other 4 units that take too long to dry clothes are just underpowered wattage wise. My question: is there a 208v element for these units that will make them work good?

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

you may be able to re-string them..

model numbers ?

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All Dryers: Samsung DV220AEW. Read my notes wrong. 

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I would theorize that the resistance heaters would last longer, all things being equal at the motor end,assuming full robust  ramp up and rpms. Running at 104 volts per leg, and not the nameplate voltage of 110  would suggest that the centrifugal switches are hanging up a second or two longer than @ 110 vac, causing premature motor failure long term. I would suspect long, obstructed vents and slightly lower rpms as being the root cause of heater failure. i havent seen too many apt complexes in my rfd Mayberry world, but lots of condos. In almost all cases, the vent arrangements are piss poor at best.There is a well established builder that installs duct boosters as S.O.P. in all ski condo's etc unless dryer is mounted on an outside wall and direct vented. Anybody else want to weigh in?

Edited by telefunkenu47

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Vents are 85% clean and booster works good. Cleaned vents and inside dryers. Have to think the 208 is not enough wattage power and longer run times to get clothes dry wear out element more. Thanks for the input.

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Great find, Reg!  I miss ol' Keino, wonder what he's up to these days.

 

In case the attachment can't be viewed in the linked topic, I'm including it here:

 

gallery_4_19_58946.jpg

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also, Element over-heating and burn-out would be caused by a bad Vent system

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Samsung dryers in particular are known for going through heater assemblies.

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This subject made me think of a can of worms I almost opened last year.  We do the repair work for a large catalog clothing company and I was working on a washer and dryer in one of their labs.  One of the workers came in and we were chatting about a few things and I asked  what they did in that particular lab with the six or seven sets of washers and dryers.  She said the did lifetime testing of the clothing.  Since they had various gadgets all around and doing all different calculations, for some reason I decided to ask if they were aware of the difference of voltage in their lab (208V) and the voltage in a home and that it made the dryers run longer than one in a home. Before I mentioned any numbers like about 25% less watts, I could see the wheels spinning in her head and eyes popping wide open and she said "are you serious?" So I said yea but its minimal, lets forget I mentioned that.... I didn't want to deal with explaining the whole thing to corporate peeps around there, so I left it at that. 

Edited by maytagman

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Dryer maximum (Thermostat) temperatures should be the same...

but with a 208v Heater (25% less wattage), and a full load of wet clothes,

it will take a longer time to reach that maximum (Thermostat) temperature.

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General Electric used to sell alternate heater coils for 208 volts.

Edited by Scottthewolf

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General Electric used to sell alternate heater coils for 208 volts.

so did Whirlpool / Maytag / Amana / Speed Queen

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We had to replace a lot of 50 cycle motors for GI's returning from Britain at Dow afb in Bangor, ME.Am I really that old?

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