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AlexM

Whirlpool Cabrio Model# WTW6600SW2, UL Error Code, plus issues.

15 posts in this topic

This cabrio is used by a dog groomer and has issues. It won't actually run throught the entire cycle and shows a 'UL' error code, from what i understand, this could be the suspension rod balls?  and they claim its very noisy in spin, likely bearings?  I've attached pics of the underside and  was wondering what the liquid is that is spraying all over...water coming through the bearings?

 

Is there hope for this machine?

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

Last machine I had like that I condemned.

 

List of possible parts required:

 

- Tub bearing and shaft kit

- motor (the windings part - after having water sprayed all through the windings, I would never trust it.)

- motor (the hub part - with the magnets.  If you can actually pull that off, you will likely find the magnets are all rusty.)

- RPS (again due to water being sprayed through it.)

- harness (take a really close look at all connectors.  Wet connectors with electricity running through them corrode really fast.)

 

Plus labour = not worth it.

Edited by Strathy

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She has already asked me what machine she should buy that would keep up with 3 loads a day with heavy towels loaded with dog hair?

 

thanks for the insight.

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Make sure you don't advise a high efficiency machine.  Dog hair needs a full tub of water to be floated off - the low water fill on HE machines leaves the hair behind.  Ya ... learned this one the hard way!  lol.  

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Great advice, I didn't think of that.

Is there any salvage value to the old unit? I've been very good about not being a pack rat with no old appliances laying around my place.

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Some copper in the windings - the rest is plastic = mostly junk.  lol.  

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... what machine she should buy that would keep up with 3 loads a day with heavy towels loaded with dog hair?

Speed Queen

http://www.ajmadison.com/

anyone else agree ?

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Great pics, Alex!  I gotta remember to add those to the Gallery.  

 

Personally, I'm partial to front loaders.  We've been using them for over 16 years, family of 5, German Shepherds, cats, the works.  But I don't know of any residential machine that will stand up for very long to the rigors of a dog grooming place day after day.   IMHO, it is not reasonable to expect years a service life from a residential machine anywhere approaching what you'd get in a normal home setting.

 

If think if they're going to go with a residential machine, doesn't matter which brand, then they should just resign themselves to replacing that machine every two years as a cost of doing bidness.  None of the residential machines are built for commercial use.  You could argue that many of them are hardly built for residential use.  

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 You could argue that many of them are hardly built for residential use.  

 

Samurai may just have the quote of the week!  Well played sir, well played. (golf clap)

Edited by Thirstytech

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I just did my first bearing kit replacement on a identical machine.  I came away with multiple questions:

 

1. the gasket is glued and greased in, does the grease make a water seal next to the spindle and then the glue makes a water seal on the outside?

2. I tightned the axel nut and then it bound the bearings making it difficult to turn, I backed it off in tell it didn't bind anymore, too loose? will that back off and fall off?

3. When I was all complete I went to put it into manual spin mode, but couldn't get it to work, the lid lock sequence didn't work for me, and it said it needed water. Is there a easy way to get this to spin fast to test the bearings without putting it through a wash cycle?

4. Should I be using locktight on the 1/4" hex bolt that holds on the rotor? anytime I pull a rotor off?

5. It took me over three hours to do my first one, what is a realistic for how long this would take an experienced tech?

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45 mins for me to do this job now.  Done about 25 of them.  

 

I don't use loctite.

 

Never had a problem with testing. 

 

Not sure about your 'axel nut' issue - never had that problem.

 

Glue holds it in, grease makes the shaft run smooth in the bearing.  

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For the testing, do you do the hold for 3 seconds, etc  then go straight to the spin test?

 

So the glue and the grease keeps it from leaking?

 

Thats awesome that you can crank these out in such a short time!

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Here is what my memory tells me is the procedure to put into Manual test mode to check spin

 

Press and hold any button for 3 seconds - then release for 3 seconds  ... do this 3 times.  When you see 8's, hit the same button one more time.  This will put you into manual test.  

 

Press 'extra Rinse' to lock the lid.

 

Then hit 'spin speed' to activate spin .. each press makes it faster ... I think there are 3 speeds.

 

All this should be on the tech sheet though.  

 

Grease has nothing to do with leaking (I don't think) ... it's the glue that holds the tub seal in place that stops leaks. 

 

Sorry ... that's the best I can do from memory.  Anything more and I'll have to look up the tech sheet which I ain't gonna do tonight ... lol.  

Edited by Strathy

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Thanks!

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Also you can select rinse/spin and deselect(is that a word?) 2nd rinse and then it should run a spin only. Grease lubricates the seal lips against the shaft, glue is a security measure to make sure seal stays put

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