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tpoindexter

Should Appliances be plugged into GFI outlets?

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mastertech011

THEY say your modern appliances shouldnt trip them, but Im not betting my fridge or freezer full of food on it.

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AppTech

i agree.

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J5*

I just had to read up on what a gfi is , seems it’s similar to our rcd residual currrent device which measures current leak to earth but works differently

typically we don’t have any real issues with nuisance tripping of units

typically ovens wont be installed on a protected circuit due to heating elements 

fridges typically in a new build should be on their own circuit so don’t switch off from another’s fault 

a reasonable amount of work I do is defrost elements leaking to earth or dishwashers tripping power due to a leak 

it seem strange for a safety device over there that it doesn’t seem to work too well when most items are said to not be plugged into them. 

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jordanlee

On refrigerator outlets I always recommend to my customers to get a surge protector. It will save them big bucks in the long run. However the GFCI Recepticals will always give trouble.

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PEvans

My laundry room is finished, but has a sink within 6' of the 120V outlet. Doesn't that mean I have to have a GFCI in that outlet?

 

.

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coolhandluke

Probably due to the sink, you can check your local plumbing/electrical code requirements.

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Bintiwangu

I guess this is kinda sorta  related to the GFCI topic. When I lived in Nebraska., most of what I did was sell, design, and install hydronic radiant floor heating systems in shops and show homes. 

But occasionally we did an Electric cable system instead of tubing and boiler. Those Cable Systems were required (at least by Nebraska code) to be wired to a GFEP. I don't know anything about them other than they stand for ground-fault equipment protection and are supposed to be even more sensitive than the ground fault circuit interrupter. Oh and I think they cost a lot more too.

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