Learn how to troubleshoot using schematics like a real tech…

Click here to check out our structured, online appliance repair training courses for rookies and experienced techs.

FAQs | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Podcast | Contact

Stay connected with us...

Samurai on Facebook - become a fan today! Sign up for our free newsletter and keep up with all things Appliantology. Subscribe to our YouTube channel for lots of appliance repair tips and help! Follow the Samurai on Twitter and get timely morsels of Appliantological Wisdom! Subscribe to our MST Radio podcast to learn secrets of the trade.
  • Announcements

    • Samurai Appliance Repair Man

      Webinar Recordings Index Page   10/03/2017

      On-demand appliance repair training videos for Professional Appliantologist members Over 30 hours (and growing!) of original, high quality appliance training webinars developed and given by yours truly are at your fingertips, on topics you won't find anywhere else. Fill in those knowledge gaps, strengthen those areas of uncertainty, and boost your skills. Watch on mobile or desktop at your convenience whenever, wherever.  Ultra Short Primer on Basic Electricity, Circuits, Ohm's Law, and Schematic Reading (Length: 1:04:48) Basic Refrigerator Troubleshooting (Length: 1:10:45) Schematic Reading Workshop, 10/2015 (Length 1:19:08) Troubleshooting Strategies for Computer-Controlled Appliances (Length: 48:34) Semiconductors and PN Junctions (Length: 1:04:37) Appliance Temperature Sensing Devices & Technology (Length: 1:27:33) Voltage Measurements, Meters, Ghost Voltages, and Triac-controlled Neutrals (Length: 1:29:32) Troubleshooting with Tech Sheets, Part 1, 4/2016 (Length: 1:09:26) Troubleshooting with Tech Sheets, Part 2, 4/2016 (Length: 1:21:11) Tech Sheet Review, 4/9/2016: Bosch Speed Cooker, Amana Refrigerator, GE Glass Cooktop Range (Length: 1:22:58) Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) Switches used in Samsung Switched Mode Power Supplies (SMPS) (Length: 27:07) PWM Computer Cooling Fan in a Whirlpool Refrigerator (Length: 14:53) Understanding AC Split-phase Household Power Supplies (Length: 52:41) Troubleshooting a Samsung Electric Dryer without Disassembly using Live Tests and the Schematic (Length: 22:47) Troubleshooting a Bosch Dishwasher No-Heat Problem using the Schematic and Live Tests (Length: 15:38) Linear Motors and Linear Compressors (Length: 55:54) Bi-directional PSC Drive Motor Systems in Whirlpool VM Washers (Length: 56:52) Appliance Service Call Structure and Troubleshooting Strategies (Length: 1:00:16) The Ten Step Troubleshooting Tango and Workshop Exercises (Length: 1:35:39) Troubleshooting Ten-Step Tango Advanced Workshop (Length: 1:32:06) Ten-Step Tango Troubleshooting Workshop: Refrigerators (Length: 1:35:57) Whirlpool Duet Washer Schematic Analysis & Whirlpool Dryer Moisture Sensor System (Length: 1:03:04) Neutral Vs. Ground, Inverter Microwave, Digital Communications, Loading Down in DC loads, and more! (Length: 1:14:45) Gas Oven Service Call After a Parts Changing Monkey (Length: 36:04) AFCI and GFCI Circuit Protection Technology (Length: 41:26) Troubleshooting Samsung Refrigerators and more (Length: 1:29:58) 3-way Valves and Dual Evaporator Refrigerators (Length: 1:15:45) Split-Phase Compressors and PTC Start Devices (Length: 1:11:57) Gas Dryer Ignition Systems (Length: 53:50) Refrigerator Sealed System Thermodynamics, Part 1 (Length: 43:07) Refrigerator Sealed System Thermodynamics, Part 2 (Length 1:09:09) To access these webinars and all the other info-goodies here at Appliantology, become a Professional Appliantologist today. If you need cost-effective, time-flexible, state-of-the-art appliance technical training, check out the Master Samurai Tech Academy.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

applianceman18007260692

condenser fan blade

Recommended Posts

applianceman18007260692

your central unit outside condenser motor is gonna someday die, thats a fact of life, will you pay some guy 450 dollars to replace a 75 dollar part? or will you go for broke and fix that puppy yourself? one thing to keep in mind is the blade being attached to the worn out motor aint gonna wanna depart from its dead buddy too easy. ok maybe you got 50 bucks to go buy another blade and dont give a dang ,but if you take your time and do it right, you can remove the old blade and save some suds money .put the old motor and blade into a vise, get some sand cloth and start smoothing up the motor shaft surface between the blade and the motor get it as clean as you can ,then take a piece of hollow pipe about 6 inches long and place it on the hub being carefull not to hit the shaft ,you never want to hit the shaft, as it will expand and not allow the hub to come free ,DONT BEAT ON IT! tap down on the hub of the blade,with the hollow pipe,into the cleaned portion of the motor shaft ,and then, sand smooth the portion of the upper shaft you have exposed. add some good penetrating oil and wiggle the sucker off .Take your time and you will save money :dude:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Good tip, Applianceman! Keep posting pearls of wisdom like that as the spirit moves you and before long, you'll have a vast, searchable repository of HVAC wisdom right here and available for anyone to read.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jahjahbinks

and to add to that one of the most valuable features on your heating system cost about $0.50  . what could it be you ask ? the air filter, i have found the standard blue filter really works better then the more expensive ones for this fact it allow better air flow then the micro filters altho the micro filters say they last up to 3 months it can become blocked in the first two weeks and drasticly reduce the air flow to the blower motor making it work twice as hard with even less results thus causing the motor to burnout sooner and when the blower moter goes then you can develop other problems with other parts of the heating and /or cooling system  , and if you have a/c some dont but the same rule applies but moreso for those who have a/c never run the system without the air filter because now the cooling coil inside will begin to act as the filter and once it gets blocked/pluged it will cost a small fortune to have this problem corrected , spend a little and save alot,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mopar X

I Like the cheap blue filter also mostly because of what I charge to clean the evap coil after a year of them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
superba

[user=1635]jahjahbinks[/user] wrote:

and to add to that one of the most valuable features on your heating system cost about $0.50 . what could it be you ask ? the air filter, i have found the standard blue filter really works better then the more expensive ones for this fact it allow better air flow then the micro filters altho the micro filters say they last up to 3 months it can become blocked in the first two weeks and drasticly reduce the air flow to the blower motor making it work twice as hard with even less results thus causing the motor to burnout sooner and when the blower moter goes then you can develop other problems with other parts of the heating and /or cooling system , and if you have a/c some dont but the same rule applies but moreso for those who have a/c never run the system without the air filter because now the cooling coil inside will begin to act as the filter and once it gets blocked/pluged it will cost a small fortune to have this problem corrected , spend a little and save alot,

Hi,

Help me out on this. Are you referring to the system air filter that filters the return air to the blower(heating and cooling if applicable)? The one where I live is 14x24x1; a 3M is presently installed.

Mine is ready for change; how do I identify a "standard blue filter"? Brand? Source? Home Depot, Lowe's, OSH, Walmart, Target?

Sounds good to me.

TIA.

Cheers!

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jedi Appliance Guy

The Force dictates that I must tell you, that if you are using a 3m pleated filter that is the correct size, you should stick with what you're using.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites