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Crouching Tiger

heating options

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Crouching Tiger

I'm looking to build a two storey house with full basement.  First and second floors are hoping to be 1000 sq. ft. each.  The location is southern Ontario which is warm and humid in the summer and usually fairly cold in the winter.  Natural gas is not available in the rural section of town.  My options are either propane, oil or electric.  I would like a forced air unit so that a C/A unit can be installed.  I will also be installing at least one propane fire place which will be on the main floor.  Should I consider radiant in floor heating as an option?  I am also going to look up info on heat pumps.  Any additional information would be a great help.

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jahjahbinks

 would suggest the heat pump for now but have you checked into solar heat? i`m cheep and will try to be as self reliant as posibile , what you need to look at is cost and need , well you need power to run whatever you have  if you can go solar go for it , then you have the windmill @3mph will supply more energy then you need , you can install these yourself , or get a generic power unit cost about $3.000.00 to 8.000.00 and run it off propane however you will have to shut it down for general maintaince , all that a have suggested i have used and found to work fine , self powered sence 2001 ,  but have still have all gas and electric appliances ready to operate. even my engineering teacher was impressed . just do some FOWARD THINKING.

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ServiceGuy

Interesting Topic, Solar power.

Any links for more info on wind mills?

Heatpumps are fairly useless below 40F

You'll then have to have either electric strip or propane for comfort on those degree days below 40.

If the price is right, radiant floor heat is a major winner. That would be the direction I would go. I think the only consideration would be the cost of propane. Find out and tell us about it!!  

Good luck

Bernie  

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Northern-Tech

I realize that you are looking for something, that central air can be tied into. Just for info, last year, I put in an outdoor woodstove, from Central boiler. This heats 2 houses, with approx 4500 sq. feet. The houses have never been warmer, and yes,. it gets cold up here. ( At one time, White River was famous for the big thermometer on the highway, that said, the coldest spot in canada ). Im sure it wasn't, but it does get cold. I dont know if this is an option for you,....... availablilty off wood, local bylaws,etc. ( some places will not allow them in areas, due to possibility of smoke bothering your neighbour ). Was not an issue for me. If you need further info, let me know and I will be glad to assist.                                 ;)

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Crouching Tiger

Thanks for the input.  I know what you mean about cold - I lived in Timmins for two years - the skiing was great but I remember some days coming down the hill with a   -35 'C wind in my face freezing the tears in my eyes instantly. 

Since my last post I have done some good research as to which fuel I will be considering.  I plan on buying a gas dryer, range and fireplace and water heater as well as having the BBQ with a quick disconnect outside eliminating the chance of running out of fuel two minutes into grilling a nice juicy sirloin.  These will all be on propane, so I might as well go for the high efficiency propane furnace as well.  I am also installing a heat pump that is able to guarantee a good heat supply down to -5'C which will also provide cooling in the summer.  Of course I am going to have to have the cigar tank sitting outside to handle the load but I have no choice about that. 

I have talked with others in the area who have the Central boiler system and they have a hard time keeping the supply of wood around.  The average price for a cord of wood cut , delivered, and stacked is about $250 Cdn.  The acreage we are building on is mainly farm fields so cutting the wood myself is not an option, besides I don't much like the thought of having to cut, split and store wood - I'd rather stick pine needles in my eyes.

The only thing I have to do now is find a good supplier of propane that will give us a good price plan. 

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applianceman18007260692

why not use as an alternative ? a chem/hydro/solar dome? this dome has thousands of mirrors focused on a ceramic boiler which is thermally induced by evaporation propertys in the chemically treated water which is then transferred to base boards that sense chemical reactions to heat and cold.

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Crouching Tiger

Thanks for the reply, although this would address my heating supply I am still going to have the propane outside to fire the range, dryer, fireplace and maybe a unit heater for the garage. 

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Guest ahammer48

Don't do it !!!!!!!!:poison:  No radiant flr or baseboard on a propane tank:yikes: I have a 2 story in NM, 2800 sq/ft and use propane for all. Have a 250 gal tank. Even though we have mild winters, usually, it sucked me dry. 3-4 tanks a season @ $300-400 a pop, no-no-no.

Consider a pellet/corn stove. I bought a nice Whitfield for $2500. Does the entire house from the 1st flr(we also have alot of ceiling fans which help move the air around). I use 2 tons of pellets a season @ $300 per ton. Mine uses wood pellets but I understand that corn/wood pellets are even better. On most U can adjust the heat output and the fan spd for comfort. Mines 10 yrs old, no problems, very little ash made and I understand the new ones come witha remote control.

I must warn you . Last season there was a wood pellet shortage here in the USA. With natural gas prices going so high alot of ppl bought wood pellet stoves but there was no ramp up in woodpellets manufacturing. If it happens again U can then switch to corn.;)

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