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John C.

Kenmore 80 series keeps stoppin

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John C.

I realize that my washing machine is no spring chicken, but since I live alone and only do a load every 10 days or so, overall it hasn't seen as much use as it would otherwise with a normal sized family.

Recently I had to replace the coupler thanks to a seriously out of balance load. That repair was uneventful, and I was able to run one load normally. However, since that one load the machine has taken to shutting off at random points during the entire cycle. When it does that, I will unplug the machine, push in the knob and wait for 5 to 10 minutes. Then I plug the machine back on, pull out the knob and the machine resumes running as if nothing happened.

It will usually do this two or three times during a cycle. I've checked all the connectors (they're on tightly) and the lid switch (nothing wrong there), so I'm baffled by this problem.

Does anybody have any idea what might be going on?

TIA!

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PDuff

Sounds like the dryer is shutting off due to overheating of the thermal cutout on the drive motor.  Remove the cabinet the same way you did when replacing the motor coupling and examine the motor, particularly where the white wire connects to the thermal cutout.  You may find some damage to the wire connector that you can repair if caught in time.

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sh2sh2

Also make sure the coupler is installed completely, if not the motor will be bound up and give these symptoms

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John C.
7 hours ago, PDuff said:

Sounds like the dryer is shutting off due to overheating of the thermal cutout on the drive motor.  Remove the cabinet the same way you did when replacing the motor coupling and examine the motor, particularly where the white wire connects to the thermal cutout.  You may find some damage to the wire connector that you can repair if caught in time.

Thanks for replying, but as I said in my message it's a washing machine, not a dryer. That is, unless you meant washer instead of dryer.

 

2 hours ago, sh2sh2 said:

Also make sure the coupler is installed completely, if not the motor will be bound up and give these symptoms

Yes, I figured that might be a problem when I did the repair, so I was very careful to install the coupler completely as well as to clean out all the debris from the coupler that gave out. I will take another look though.

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John C.

I finally got around to checking how well I'd installed the coupler. I had put the "finger" attachments on the shafts so that they were even with the ends of the shafts. So I put a socket on them and pounded them down further on the shafts, but not enough to bind anything up. Probably won't make much difference though. As for the "thermal cutout", I'm afraid I'm unable to determine where that's located on the drive motor. An exploded view of the motor is here:

http://www.searspartsdirect.com/model-part/11092283100/0582/0153200/00061408/00006.html

but the list of parts doesn't include a reference to a thermal cutout.

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vee8power

Thanks for the link; it has your model#. Look closely at this picture of your motor. The thermal cut out is in the motor. The white wire connects to it. Hafta buy the whole motor.

Part number: AP2907974

Part number: AP2907974

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John C.
7 hours ago, vee8power said:

Thanks for the link; it has your model#. Look closely at this picture of your motor. The thermal cut out is in the motor. The white wire connects to it. Hafta buy the whole motor.

Part number: AP2907974

Part number: AP2907974

Thanks very much for this info! If, after my attempt to "loosen" up the coupler yesterday, the machine still keeps shutting off, I guess it will be time to get a new washer. Or start going to the laundromat, since I don't have the money for a new machine. According to the Sears.com site: "This part is no longer available through the original manufacturer. No authorized substitutions have been identified." It's probably available elsewhere, but since they're so expensive it's not cost effective.

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Gnominator77

Could also be a problem with the timer.

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DanInKansas

Came here to say what Gnominator77 says above. 

Also could be a lid switch that is coming undone. I have had several that get overheated and stop the machine in cycle. 

A couple of super easy tests. Pop the panel so you can see the back of the timer. Run washer until it starts. Whack the timer with the back of a screwdriver. Jostle the timer a bit. If the unit takes of running, you know it's the timer. 

WHen the unit stops, open the lid, take a pencil, and jab the lid switch up and down. If the unit takes off running, you have a lid switch issue. 

If neither one of those quick and dirty tests gives  you a good result, you'll need to have a meter that reads voltage and continuity, and you'll need the schematic for the washer. 

Take the meter and read the lid switch open and closed. Only acceptable value for open is no continuity. Closed you should have less than 1 ohm. 

Find where voltage is going out of the timer to the motor during the agitate cycle. When the unit stops, you'll need to put your meter right there and see if the motor is getting 120 VAC. If not, bad timer. If so, bad motor.

Also, if the motor is burning hot to the touch, that's one thing to point you to the overload mentioned above. 

I have fixed more than one of these by finding loose wiring at the overload, the capacitor, or at the leads to the motor. 

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John C.
22 hours ago, Gnominator77 said:

Could also be a problem with the timer.

Yes, I've considered this. However, no such problem was occuring before my coupler went out. It only started happening after I replaced the coupler after it fell apart.

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John C.
10 hours ago, DanInKansas said:

Came here to say what Gnominator77 says above. 

Also could be a lid switch that is coming undone. I have had several that get overheated and stop the machine in cycle. 

A couple of super easy tests. Pop the panel so you can see the back of the timer. Run washer until it starts. Whack the timer with the back of a screwdriver. Jostle the timer a bit. If the unit takes of running, you know it's the timer. 

WHen the unit stops, open the lid, take a pencil, and jab the lid switch up and down. If the unit takes off running, you have a lid switch issue. 

If neither one of those quick and dirty tests gives  you a good result, you'll need to have a meter that reads voltage and continuity, and you'll need the schematic for the washer. 

Take the meter and read the lid switch open and closed. Only acceptable value for open is no continuity. Closed you should have less than 1 ohm. 

Find where voltage is going out of the timer to the motor during the agitate cycle. When the unit stops, you'll need to put your meter right there and see if the motor is getting 120 VAC. If not, bad timer. If so, bad motor.

Also, if the motor is burning hot to the touch, that's one thing to point you to the overload mentioned above. 

I have fixed more than one of these by finding loose wiring at the overload, the capacitor, or at the leads to the motor. 

Thanks to you and Gnominator77 for your suggestions! I'm going to attempt to run another load (once I get enough laundry piled up for one) and if it starts shutting off again, I'll try the tests you recommend. Thanks again!

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John C.

Sorry it's taken so long for me to get back and report on what happened. Like I said, I don't run a lot of loads in my washing machine. Also, I needed to run the previous load at a time where a machine failure would have really been disastrous, so I did it at the laundromat.

I had originally put in the new coupler so that the flanges were flush with the ends of their shafts. This might not have been far enough and could have caused the motor to bind and heat up. Accordingly, I took my machine apart again and using a long socket with my rubber hammer, pounded the motor and transmission flanges on further so their their respective shaft ends stuck out past them a little bit. Then I reassembled the machine.

Yesterday, I ran a medium load through and the machine was able to make it through without stopping. I'm not saying that my problem is completely repaired, but it looks like this may be the case. At least I know I can run a load of a certain size through without worrying. I hope.

My thanks to everybody who replied, especially shsh2 who mentioned the coupler possibility. At this point, it looks like that was the problem.

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