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      Webinar Recordings Index Page   07/27/2017

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ntp

Dryer Getting Too Hot?

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ntp   
ntp

On my GE WSM2700DAWW, the dryer smelled like it is getting too hot, but I am not sure.  When I opened it and put my hand against the back of the drum it burned me within 2 seconds (I know, dumb).  I splashed some water on it, and the water sizzled.  

With the dryer running on the low-temperature setting, I used a meat thermometer to measure the temperature of the air out of the blower.  It peaked about 160 degrees fahrenheit.

I have confirmed that the dryer duct is not plugged.

Thoughts?

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ntp   
ntp

Also, I have confirmed that the dryer cools down during the last 10 minutes of the cycle.  So, I think it's probably not a shorted heating element?

Thanks,

Neil

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spencertech   
spencertech

unhook the vent and test the dryer temperature. If it operates normal double check the vent.

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johntech   
johntech
Posted (edited)

The cycling thermostat on your machine is l260 which opens or turns off the heat at 260 degrees and closes or turns on the heat at 210 degrees. 160 would be the expected exhaust temp. The heating element is about 2 inches from the back wall of the dryer so it will get hot. If it drys your clothes within 45 minutes to an hour and is not burning them the it sounds like everything is good. When checking the parts breakdown I do not see a temp selector switch for the dryer. I would assume that you selected a low heat setting on the timer itself. The way that dryer lowers the temp is by energizing the heater for less time on the low temp cycle. Disconnect the duct like spencer said and see it behaves as you would expect it. If it has a air dry cycle select that and make sure it does not heat.

Edited by johntech

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ntp   
ntp

Johntech is right-I did select a low heat setting on the timer.  The only way to run it without heat is the last few minutes of the low-temperature cycle on the timer.  I set it there, and it operates without heating.  

I also disconnected the vent and ran it.  That's when I got a peak temperature of about 160 on the exhaust (right out of the blower).  I am not certain, but I don't think disconnecting the vent changed the way the dryer was operating.

In short, I think it was probably a false alarm because I didn't know just what to expect from it.  Will keep an eye on it.

Anyway, thanks so much for very generously helping me with this! 

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