Learn how to troubleshoot using schematics like a real tech…

Click here to check out our structured, online appliance repair training courses for rookies and experienced techs.

FAQs | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Podcast | Contact

Stay connected with us...

Samurai on Facebook - become a fan today! Sign up for our free newsletter and keep up with all things Appliantology. Subscribe to our YouTube channel for lots of appliance repair tips and help! Follow the Samurai on Twitter and get timely morsels of Appliantological Wisdom! Subscribe to our MST Radio podcast to learn secrets of the trade.
  • Announcements

    • Samurai Appliance Repair Man

      Webinar Recordings Index Page   10/03/2017

      On-demand appliance repair training videos for Professional Appliantologist members Over 30 hours (and growing!) of original, high quality appliance training webinars developed and given by yours truly are at your fingertips, on topics you won't find anywhere else. Fill in those knowledge gaps, strengthen those areas of uncertainty, and boost your skills. Watch on mobile or desktop at your convenience whenever, wherever.  Ultra Short Primer on Basic Electricity, Circuits, Ohm's Law, and Schematic Reading (Length: 1:04:48) Basic Refrigerator Troubleshooting (Length: 1:10:45) Schematic Reading Workshop, 10/2015 (Length 1:19:08) Troubleshooting Strategies for Computer-Controlled Appliances (Length: 48:34) Semiconductors and PN Junctions (Length: 1:04:37) Appliance Temperature Sensing Devices & Technology (Length: 1:27:33) Voltage Measurements, Meters, Ghost Voltages, and Triac-controlled Neutrals (Length: 1:29:32) Troubleshooting with Tech Sheets, Part 1, 4/2016 (Length: 1:09:26) Troubleshooting with Tech Sheets, Part 2, 4/2016 (Length: 1:21:11) Tech Sheet Review, 4/9/2016: Bosch Speed Cooker, Amana Refrigerator, GE Glass Cooktop Range (Length: 1:22:58) Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) Switches used in Samsung Switched Mode Power Supplies (SMPS) (Length: 27:07) PWM Computer Cooling Fan in a Whirlpool Refrigerator (Length: 14:53) Understanding AC Split-phase Household Power Supplies (Length: 52:41) Troubleshooting a Samsung Electric Dryer without Disassembly using Live Tests and the Schematic (Length: 22:47) Troubleshooting a Bosch Dishwasher No-Heat Problem using the Schematic and Live Tests (Length: 15:38) Linear Motors and Linear Compressors (Length: 55:54) Bi-directional PSC Drive Motor Systems in Whirlpool VM Washers (Length: 56:52) Appliance Service Call Structure and Troubleshooting Strategies (Length: 1:00:16) The Ten Step Troubleshooting Tango and Workshop Exercises (Length: 1:35:39) Troubleshooting Ten-Step Tango Advanced Workshop (Length: 1:32:06) Ten-Step Tango Troubleshooting Workshop: Refrigerators (Length: 1:35:57) Whirlpool Duet Washer Schematic Analysis & Whirlpool Dryer Moisture Sensor System (Length: 1:03:04) Neutral Vs. Ground, Inverter Microwave, Digital Communications, Loading Down in DC loads, and more! (Length: 1:14:45) Gas Oven Service Call After a Parts Changing Monkey (Length: 36:04) AFCI and GFCI Circuit Protection Technology (Length: 41:26) Troubleshooting Samsung Refrigerators and more (Length: 1:29:58) 3-way Valves and Dual Evaporator Refrigerators (Length: 1:15:45) Split-Phase Compressors and PTC Start Devices (Length: 1:11:57) Gas Dryer Ignition Systems (Length: 53:50) Refrigerator Sealed System Thermodynamics, Part 1 (Length: 43:07) Refrigerator Sealed System Thermodynamics, Part 2 (Length 1:09:09) To access these webinars and all the other info-goodies here at Appliantology, become a Professional Appliantologist today. If you need cost-effective, time-flexible, state-of-the-art appliance technical training, check out the Master Samurai Tech Academy.
    • Samurai Appliance Repair Man

      [Webinar] Practical Refrigeration Sealed System Thermodynamics - 10/30/2017 @7PM ET   10/19/2017

      Having laid some theoretical groundwork in the last webinar, we're going to focus on practical considerations in this one. Here are the topics we're going to discuss: Review homework from the first session on 10-2-2017. Home refrigerator practical design and operating rules-of-thumb useful for troubleshooting Practical application exercises Troubleshooting scenario exercise Techniques for making system temperature measurements for determining superheat and subcooling Sealed system diagnosis homework assignment (to be reviewed in the next webinar in this series) See this calendar event for more details                   
28strepair

plz help! ELECTROLUX freezer warm E42BS75EP

Recommended Posts

28strepair

I HAVE AN ELECTROLUX MODEL E42BS75EP 42" BUILT IN, DUAL EVAPORATOR UNIT THATS DRIVING ME CRAZY !!!

PROBLEM :RUNS FOR A BIT THEN STOPS AND WONT TURN BACK ON  

WHEN I CYCLE THE POWER  THE UNIT THE FRIDGE RUNS FOR ABOUT AN HOUR.   CONDENSER FAN NOT RUNNING   THEN STOPS  

ON THE DIGITAL DISPLAY  THE FRIDGE GETS TO SET TEMP   FREEZER GETS TO ABOUT 17 AND IS SET TO 5 

AS TIME PASSES THE FREEZER TEMP WILL RISE PAST 32 BUT THE FRIDGE DISPLAY TEMP MAINTAINS 37 BUT IN REALITY IT HAS RISEN AS WELL 

AT TIMES THE UNIT WILL RUN WITH THE CONDENSER FAN ALSO RUNNING AT WHICH POINT IT WILL TAKE IT TEMPS DOWN TO SET TEMPS OF 5 AND 37DEGREES

WHEN THE CONDENSER FAN IS NOT RUNNING THERE IS NO POWER TO THE FAN WHEN IT IS RUNNING THERE IS 8 VOLTS 

I CAN HEAR BOTH OF THE EVAPORATOR FANS RUNNING WHEN I OPEN THE DOOR AND HOLD THE LIGHT SWITCH  

I REPLACED THE CONTROL CIRCUT BOARD,  NOTHING CHANGED SAME PROBLEM

I STILL THINK  ITS A CONTROL BOARD , SHOULD I ORDER ANOTHER ONE ?

WHY DOES THE CONDENSER FAN HAVE 3 WIRES , COULD THE FAN BE BAD ? EVEN THOUGH IT RUNS AT TIMES AND SOMETIMES IT MAKES A FEW ROTATIONS THEN STOPS  

AT MY WITTS END AND PARTS ARE CRAZY EXPENSIVE   PLEASE HELP!! WHAT COULD BE CAUSING THIS PROBLEM ?

HAD A REPAIRMAN TAKE A LOOK AND HE WASN'T SURE JUST BASICALLY TOLD ME I SHOULD CHANGE THE CONDENSER FAN AT A COST OF ALMOST $600 

PLZ GIVE ME YOUR THOUGHTS    THANK YOU!!

 
  •  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

Scottthewolf

Yes, that is one expensive condenser fan motor assembly.  In all honesty, everything in this unit is electronically controlled.  Sometimes a bad fan motor can cause an electronic control board to go bad.  I would replace the electronic control board and the condenser fan motor together.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28strepair

ok sounds like a good plan thank you!!   but I was just curious would a thermistor or defrost thermostat be causing this sort of problem also ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scottthewolf

Very unlikely.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rhubarb Tau

Yikes, just checked our retail price on the condensor fan motor ass'y - $410 and change.

@Scottthewolf, agreed, I wouldn't expect any sensor input to interrupt power to the condensor fan. Still, I've been surprised before.

@28strepair If you have some reason to suspect the thermistor, test it. At least you could rule it out. Not that the tech sheet lists thermistor values.

Your original post was kind of vague in re: what is running when. I'd say, if you ever catch the compressor running and the condensor fan not, like Scott said, replace both the main PCB and the condensor fan motor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
howdryiam

At normal ambient temperatures the condenser fan will cycle  on/off in concert with the compressor. This unit does have an ambient temperature sensor. So in unusually cold ambient conditions the control will either choose to not energize the condenser fan or pulse the condenser fan.  Pin 12 (red) of CN2 connector of the terminal block panel you see when you take the control board cover is the external sensor. At 77 degrees it should read 5k ohms (red to common dc ground - grey)

If I understand the symptoms correctly, I agree that the load of interest (and the more common failure point) is the condenser fan motor and/or the control board.

Please make sure all of your wire harness connections are secure -  with the unit unplugged disconnect and examine them and then reconnect at the board and at the condenser fan. look for broken, crushed or damaged wires. Remove the control board cover and look for the CN2 connector on the terminal block panel - should be upper left. This connector includes DC supply and feeedback for the condenser fan. Look for Pins 1, 2 and 3 - red, light blue and grey.  Pins 2 to 3 or Light Blue to Grey should be 9 -10 VDC and Pins 1 - 3 Red to Grey = 2 vdc. The 2VD at this location is a feedback signal from the fan. (That's why 3 wires to the fan)

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now