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binovc

Ken more 110 washer noise during spin

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binovc

Recent unusual noise during spin cycle on Kenmore 110.20912991. Sounds like someone trying to start a car with great battery but no gas in the tank.

Please refer to my YouTube vid and have a listen. Would appreciate if someone can advise what’s going out.

Thanks!

 

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AccApp

Is there a nasty puddle of sticky oil under the machine? It sounds like the transmission lost it's lubricant and is on it's way out.

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sh2sh2

Definitely the transmission

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binovc

No oil puddle.  Thanks all for the tranny pointers.

I'm up to the task of repairing the trans, if an option.  Can the trans be repaired, or is it pretty much just replace?

I've seen repair tutorials and transmission repair kits - just not sure if there is a rebuild kit for this model (didn't see one listed.  Did see a little bottle of transmission oil listed for $27... really??).

Any other "While I'm In There" items I might also want to replace?  (at the risk of this being a pretty lengthy list based on the age of this machine...).

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binovc

So, as to the transmission repair, could you go so far as to say whether or not the "Neutral Drain Kit 388253" will solve this?

 

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AccApp

I doubt the neutral drain kit will solve your issues. I don’t know if you can buy other internal parts for the transmission. Your options at this point are to run it until it fails or buy a new transmission.

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AccApp

There are some used transmissions for sale on eBay and some transmissions on amazon which say “refurbished”. I’m not sure what kind of pig in a poke you’re getting there.

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evaappliance

When you replace the transmission, make sure your clutch is still good ,& you will most always need to replace the drive coupling. Very good machines, it fixed will last longer than a new one !

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binovc

Wondering if someone can zero in on what part of the transmission is failing then?  The numerous disassembly/re-assembly videos seem to indicate a fairly simple construction, and it seems (to me) the most vulnerable item could be the big nylon gear, which I might be able to imagine making that noise...  I don't see any bearings on the agitator shaft, however there must be a bushing or bearing on the input shaft/worm gear - would that make the offending noise?

Might just open'er up tonight and have a look-see for anything obvious...

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AccApp

Plastic gears- almost universally silent, especially when run in an oil bath. 

 

Rip it on open and let us know what you find.

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MoTeD

Great machine worth repairing. I still have the same style. For about 250$USD you can pretty much ensure you have a washer for the next 10 years. Most common parts on this machine are the clutch, agitator dogs, lid switch, coupler, transmission and pump. I would in a hot second replace any of these items for my machine. 

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Budget Appliance Repair

Most likely a stripped out main nylon spin gear, (it used to be they only sold the nylon spin gear and pinion gear as a set for a really expensive price).

I haven't ordered or seen one but it looks like the Neutral drain pack kit is being packaged with the nylon spin gear now and the price is pretty reasonable compared to what just the spin and pinion gear set used to be.

You will have to remove all the oil and clean all the gear shavings out before replacing the spin gear and neutral drain pack.

For the time and mess involved you would be better off looking on Ebay for a new transmission, (I've seen then for around $135-$150), or a rebuilt one which you can usually find for around $125 sometimes with a new drive coupling and clutch.

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binovc

I pulled the tranny and disassembled it last night, gave it an initial clean-up.  To my untrained eye looks to be in good shape.  The nylon gear isn't stripped.

The drive coupling is wobbled out some.  So I'm going to reassemble the tranny, add 16oz of gear oil (I'm thinking 80w/90 automotive unless someone can recommend a better option).  I have some black RTV to seal the case.  Going to order a new drive coupling.  And see what happens.

Won't be able to get back to it until Thursday though.

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binovc

I cleaned it all up.  I did notice deep scoring on the gearbox cover created by the large nylon gear.  I have no idea why the gear would be contacting the lid, but it does strike me that this could be causing my noise.  Thinking about it (after I put it all back together again of course), I wonder if that gear shaft maybe isn't working it's way out...

I buttoned it all back together (with the new rubber doughnut in the drive coupling).

Still makes the noise.

:(

Kenmore 90 series washing machine gearbox cover

 

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binovc

New drive coupling and new clutch kit installed.  New transmission is on the way.  The noise has morphed into something much worse however.  Any idears?  As the spin spools up, it suddenly makes a loud noise and sort of "disengages," then starts to spool up again, repeat.  Really hoping it's the trans. 

I haven't really looked at the drive block - except just looking from above I can see the two tabs from the spin tube seated in the drive block notches.  Looks like it's right.

20171130_204122

 

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sh2sh2

Looks good

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MoTeD

After watching the video it is definitely the tranny. Replace and you should be good. I would also recommend replace the pump, coupler and dog agits at same time. 

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binovc

Well thanks to all for pitching in.

Installed new transmission Sunday, which solved the problem, which I know many of you folks stated from the beginning.  At least I got a good workout at pulling the transmission, which I did several times.  Well that's just me wanting to see if I could fix the tranny.  Still wondering if a neutral drain kit wouldn't have solved it as well.  Maybe if I get bored I'll pick one up just to see what happens!

Worst part of this ordeal was what I ended up paying for the tranny.  I found a new one for $99 on newegg dot com from a seller by the name of Union Electronic Distributors.  Five days later I get an email from newegg that they voided my order because the seller failed to ship the item.  I called the seller, and he said they ran out.  Needless to say that left a pretty bad taste in my mouth, and I certainly won't recommend either entity.  I certainly won't do business with hem.  I ended up buying one off amazon for $156+tax.  Ouch! 

Also replaced the drive coupler and clutch kit.  Replaced the pump a few years ago.  Agitator dogs are good as well.  See pic of my agitator dogs:

Agitator Dogs

(and one agitator cat!)

Really I did replace my agitator dogs a year or so ago.  I vote that to be the best name for a washing machine part, ever!

Cheers!

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binovc

...and AS I was posting this, my wife calls and tells me the washing machine overflowed.

it never ends.it never ends.it never ends. it n

I'll start a new post if I need one.....................

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MoTeD

Make sure the pressure switch hose is still connected to the outer tub and also on the switch end. 

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binovc

I just talked to my wife again, she says just the one load over flowed.  Now it's working normally.  I'll have to inspect it to make sure the pressure hose is in good shape.

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binovc

So last night I checked the pressure switch hose, all was good.  So I grudgingly decided to pull the inner tub to have a look-see at the inside of the pressure tube area.  I figured I might have issues getting the tub un-seated from the drive tube.  I was right.  I placed my spanner wrench upside-down over the drive block, and then screwed the big nut back on to the drive block, and used a 3-jaw puller between the spanner wrench and the top of the drive shaft, and finally got it free.  Then knocked the drive block out of the neck of the tub.

Plenty of mud/rust/debris down there, with a god sized glob hanging out of the pressure fitting hole (for lack of a better description).  Well this turned into a major clean-up of the inner and outer tub.  So I'm glad I got into it, because it really needed attention.

I can see in my near future I will need to pull the inner tub again to give it a proper de-rusting on the inside of the hub and paint it with rustoleum or something, or else I'm afraid it will completely rust out.  Can't have that with a brand new transmission and all.

Do all inner tubs have the plastic strainer thing attached to the bottom?  Looks like maybe that is now replaced by 4 "strainer plugs".

Can anti-seize be used between the drive block and the inner tub, or is that asking for trouble (like leaching anti-seize into the wash tub)?

Mud&debris in washer tubJunk inside water level hole

 

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AccApp

I wouldn’t put anti seize between the drive block and the tub. You really want them to lock together with nothing between them and like you said, that goop will get everywhere. It’s really not a joint meant to come apart frequently. And yes, by all means get in there and get that rust down to good clean metal and protect it somehow so it won’t rust to pieces. You could also start looking for “factory spare parts kits” being thrown away by thoughtless folks who think they are upgrading to a new machine. You just might find a spin tub in better shape than yours.

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binovc

Question regarding re-assembling the agitator and auger.  The bolt is double-ended, bottom half threads into the drive shaft, holding down the agitator (uses a 14mm deep well socket).  Then the auger and agitator dog assembly goes on and is held in place with a nylon fastener that threads on to the upper half of the double-ended bolt (using a 1/2" drive socket extension).  That bolt is tending to come loose from the drive shaft.  I'm afraid to tighten it down TOO much for fear of cracking the plastic end of the agitator.

Am I just not tightening it enough, or should I be going for the blue Loctite?  Maybe just dry off the WD40 that I used when I removed it?  When I first pulled it apart (from the old tranny), that bolt came out relatively hard - I assumed corrosion had set in.  With the new tranny it threads in easy.  Maybe too easy.

Image shows the double ended bolt with the nylon fastener still attached to the upper half.

Agitator fastener

 

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evaappliance

should be fine to put some force into where the bolt goes into the trans. but I just tighten the top part hand tight with a extension.  I have never had to use locktight there before.

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