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GE dishwasher does not heat - Model GDT580SSF2SS


Slugbait

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I have a GE dishwasher that will not heat during either wash or dry cycles. The element tested fine with an ohm meter. My machine does NOT have a thermostat. I finally called GEHelp, and they told me it's because of the Water Valve Assembly...which is hard to believe: how does something that controls water intake (which works) also activates the heating element for both wash and dry cycles? I've done at least 50 hours of reading and investigating, and I've never seen any reference anywhere on the Internet that the water valve assembly can also activate the heating element. Is this possibly true?

The only sensor in my dishwasher is the turbidity sensor, which I believe can trigger the heating element during the wash cycle, but it's also ruled out since it wouldn't have any impact on the element during the dry cycle, correct?

I'm at my wits end. I can find nothing on the Internet about the potential cause, and no one on the phone has any answers...except GE, who gave me an answer that is otherwise documented nowhere, and I'm having a really hard time believing them.

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  • AccApp

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  • Scottthewolf

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  • bowhunter

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  • Slugbait

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Do you have the schematic diagram for it? That will tell you what components are in the dishwasher.

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I can’t see how the inlet valve pictured could possibly activate the heating element. 

Most modern dishwashers don’t heat during the dry cycle. They depend upon heat stored during the wash and rinses as well as rinse aid to dry the dishes.

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There is a thermal cut out for the heater, it's part of the AC wiring harness below the tub.   Now it subs over to a complete wash pump assembly and the wiring harness in one kit.

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28 minutes ago, AccApp said:

I can’t see how the inlet valve pictured could possibly activate the heating element. 

Most modern dishwashers don’t heat during the dry cycle. They depend upon heat stored during the wash and rinses as well as rinse aid to dry the dishes.

Wrong, just Bosch and some other European dishwashers use  no heater.  All the American built dishwashers still have a heater for the drying cycle.

 

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1 hour ago, Scottthewolf said:

There is a thermal cut out for the heater, it's part of the AC wiring harness below the tub.   Now it subs over to a complete wash pump assembly and the wiring harness in one kit.

Did you mean a thermal cut off? And are you saying that the wiring harness cannot be replaced without replacing the entire wash pump assembly?

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2 hours ago, AccApp said:

Do you have the schematic diagram for it? That will tell you what components are in the dishwasher.

There are exploded view schematic diagrams at several different parts replacement websites like this one. Nowhere on the Internet is "thermal", "thermostat" or "thermistor" associated with my specific dishwasher.

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I found this:

file:///C:/Users/Peter/Downloads/c0c140df-0c49-4c4b-904f-9ff9d039ccd3.pdf

Might be similar enough to your model. The wash water thermistor is located in the flood switch assembly(#308 in sump and filter diagram) and there is a thermal cut off (TCO) on the tub (#751 in body parts diagram)

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4 minutes ago, AccApp said:

I found this:

file:///C:/Users/Peter/Downloads/c0c140df-0c49-4c4b-904f-9ff9d039ccd3.pdf

Might be similar enough to your model. The wash water thermistor is located in the flood switch assembly(#308 in sump and filter diagram) and there is a thermal cut off (TCO) on the tub (#751 in body parts diagram)

So, I assume your name is Peter. ;-)

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1 minute ago, Slugbait said:

So, I assume your name is Peter. ;-)

Yup, I guess you're not going to be able to find that file.

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4 minutes ago, Slugbait said:

So, I assume your name is Peter. ;-)

And I went to school for computers, guess that explains why I work on appliances now.

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14 minutes ago, AccApp said:

try this:

pdfstream.manualsonline.com/c/c0c140df-0c49-4c4b-904f-9ff9d039ccd3.pdf

Funny, I had actually pulled my Flood Switch and cleaned it out this past weekend...it was filthy. Cleaning it didn't get the heat back, tho'. But the part was never described as having a thermistor on any parts website I found...just "Flood Switch". None of the Q&A troubleshooting sites I found mentioned heat issues in relation to this part, only water issues. But the one in this schematic looks exactly like mine...and now that I know it has a thermistor, I think mine went defective. I'm cautiously optimistic that you nailed it. I'll pull it again tomorrow, see if I can test it...if not, I'll just get a new one, because this is the very first believable lead I've gotten. Thanks, Peter.

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So did you replace the drain pump kit with the TCO?  Did this fix the drying issue?  I am looking at a similar issue, in testing the heating element it comes on and heats as it should.  So I find it hard to believe that it is causing the heating element to stop during the drying cycle.  I had the customer run it before I arrived to test for delayed failure.  

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Did anyone ever find a solution to this?

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Did anyone find a solution to this?

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The TCO actually will stop the dishwasher from running period at least on the models of GE that I’ve worked on. The panel lights will light up but it won’t start as long as the TCO is tripped. Funny thing is that you can reset it by pushing in the button between the contacts. It can be bought without the pump assembly, but not without the wiring harness. I missed it in the parts breakdown, but had a vendor look it up and it made me feel better when it took him a long time. It’s considered part of the wiring harness. The  part number for the TCO without the pump assembly is WD21X21690

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These dishwasher repairs may help solve your dishwasher problem

-Replace the dishwasher circulation pump and motor assembly
-Replace the dishwasher drain pump
-Clear the dishwasher chopper blade area
-Replace the dishwasher wash pump motor


https://www.mynewappliancerepair.com/dishwasher-repair-houston/
Find the best dishwasher repair in houston, tx 

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On 1/17/2018 at 8:17 PM, Scottthewolf said:

Wrong, just Bosch and some other European dishwashers use  no heater.  All the American built dishwashers still have a heater for the drying cycle.

 

@Scottthewolf Thanks for putting this out there. I may have this wrong too and looking to clarify. It is my understanding that (unless a heated-dry cycle is available) dishwashers, even American style with exposed elements do not use heating element to dry dishes. Instead the water used in the last rinse cycle is heated and rinse aid is dispensed in to the water. Latent heat of the dishes in combo with the reduced surface tension of the water encourages water to sheet off the dishes water vapor to condense on tub walls and move to the sump so that it is carried away in the next drain cycle. Drying is no longer accomplished by heating elements lighting up and evaporating water.

I feel like this is super important for me to nail down correctly. We get so many calls complaining of poor drying performance (especially on lower end machines with plastic tubs). Typically customers tell me dishes are wetter than they should be. I’ll go into a diagnostic cycle and confirm the heating element is functioning properly and explain the modern (and unsatisfactory, thanks to EnergyStar ratings) drying process. 

Do I have this wrong?

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Yes, you do, ALL American dishwashers except a few models like The Electrolux  top of the line dishwasher still have a heater for the drying cycle.

Customers are LAZY, they very seldom fill the rinse aid dispenser,  they start the dishwasher before they go to bed and don't unload it until the morning.  Leaving the dishwasher with the door closed and latched overnight causes the hot steam to evaporate and recondense  and then leave the dishes even wetter than if they just opened the door at the end of the final rinse and just let the dishes air dry.

 

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Sorry about resurrecting this thread, but my issue happened again, and a quick google actually bubbled this old thread up to the top. Then I noticed a couple of other people posting asking if this was the solution...YES. The flood switch was exactly what was needed for my model of dishwasher, and it does have a thermistor.

First, the part number needed for my specific dishwasher is WD21X10519 (genuine GE part) and cost me $21.95 plus tax. There are multiple stores selling this item, you want to make sure it's shipped by Amazon, sold by GE Appliances (third-party stores tack on a few bucks).

Second, the PDF manual available at GE's website wanted me to pull the toe kick and practically disassemble the entire underbelly of the dishwasher: the manual is painfully incorrect. It is replaced from inside the tub, and is dramatically simplistic. A half-way decent handyman could finish the entire job in 30 minutes, so naturally it took me over an hour. An excellent video guide I found is below. Note that my upper rack could not be removed easily (different model than the video) but I utilized the upper rack for my flashlight anyway.

Be sure the O-ring of the new flood switch is placed properly, mine slipped off after connecting the electric cabling to the bottom of the flood switch, and I didn't noticed until I thought to double-check my work before securing it down again.

Full disclosure: I now realize I'm going to have to do this replacement every 3.5 to 4 years, and I will likely need to be reminded again how to do it, so Hi Slugbaitfouryearsfromnow. Hopefully this thread helps others in the future, too.

 

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