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rossdickey@me.com

DCS RG-30 Broiler Not Igniting

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rossdickey@me.com

I have a 15 year old DCS RG-30 that I'm pretty frustrated with because I can't get the broiler to ignite.  I've replaced the igniter (twice), and since that didn't fix it, I replaced the gas valve.  The igniter glows away, but nothing happens.  New igniter, new gas valve, but no broiler action, what on earth could be wrong with it?   

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

Terry Carmen

Check the gas pressure after the regulator (at the manifold, for example).

If the gas pressure is too high, the valve can't open.

Terry

 

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darren412

 the I/R   broil burner is bad and all blocked up possibly            214645 I/R BURNER - ASSY.       Make sure all the gas valve connections are connected and properly on too

 

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rossdickey@me.com

I've been out of town so I haven't had a chance to work on the stove, but I got back yesterday and started sleuthing.  I don't have a manometer, so I can't check the gas pressure, but I don't think it's the regulator since the stove works just fine.  I wanted to see how the gas valve works, so I pulled the old one apart, and indeed if one side works with the current pressure, the other side should too.  The gas valve is interesting, it consists of a box with a gas inlet, two gas outlets and two valve assemblies. The valves are held closed by some sort of reed shaped shape-memory alloy wrapped in wire, and little rubber flappers.  I assume that when energized, the wire around the alloy heats up, deforms the alloy and opens the valve.  When turned off, the alloy returns to its original shape and closes the valve.  Simple solution to the problem.

Next I'm going to pull the I/R assembly and see if that's the problem.  If it is, I sure hope it can be cleaned because it's $500 :D  If that's not it I'm stumped, but I'll report back and let you know     

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darren412

Yeah I was thinking the pressure was fine also when you mentioned the top was working fine. Make sure the broil igniter is pulling over 3 amps even though you may have replaced it .  also make sure your wire harness is good !   Post back as you mentioned on what you came up with. Good Luck ok 

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rossdickey@me.com

OK, it's fixed, thanks darren412.  The orifice of the I/R broiler was completely stopped up.  Just goes to show you that it's better to go through the diagnostic flowchart rather than throw parts at the problem, I would have saved a few hundred $$.  In the meantime I uploaded a two minute vid showing how a dual gas valve/igniter circuit works if anyone is interested:

 

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Budget Appliance Repair

It certainly wasn't a good idea to disassembly the gas safety valve - good potential for a gas leak in your future!!!!!

Gas valves are never meant to be disassembled and reused even if they have screws holding them together like yours does.

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rossdickey@me.com
23 hours ago, Budget Appliance Repair said:

It certainly wasn't a good idea to disassembly the gas safety valve - good potential for a gas leak in your future!!!!!

Gas valves are never meant to be disassembled and reused even if they have screws holding them together like yours does.

Hey Willie,

No worries, I didn't reuse the valve, I had already replaced this one with a new one.  When I was a kid I always took my toys apart to see how they worked, and 50 years later the urge is still with me.  I just wanted to see how the thing actually worked.  Anyway, the lesson learned from this little project is, 'don't throw parts at it, diagnose it'. The repair would have been free instead of a couple hundred $$.  My lazy logic went like this:

1. Broiler won't work, wife is unhappy 
2. It's always the igniter
3. Replace the igniter
4. Broiler still won't work, wife is unhappy
5. Dang, the gas valve must be bad
6. Replace the gas valve
7. Broiler still won't work, now I'm unhappy
8. Gripe to board
9. darren412 says it's the broiler itself
10. Pull broiler, find orifice completely clogged, clean orifice
11. Broiler works

What I should have done is:

1. Test igniter (good)
2. Test all wiring (good)
3. Test gas valve (good)
4. Pull broiler and clean

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Budget Appliance Repair

Good job - and good to hear that was the old valve you took apart.

I hear you on tearing things apart to see how they work.   My dad was a car mechanic and I pretty much grew up in the shop, started tearing carburetors apart and putting them back together at 5 years old.

Good knowledge on the inner workings of things helps to figure out what is wrong.

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