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jerome8283

CAC

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jerome8283   
jerome8283

My CAC unit isn't working properly. It's blowing warm air at times. Yesterday evening I went out and noticed the fan turning very slowly. Also, it doesn't sound right.

My CAC service came out today. They believe I need a new condenser fan motor or upgrade. I was told a new one could cost $500. They also said my unit is very old and could not guarantee after installing a new condenser fan motor that the condenser itself would not go bad.icon_rolleyes.gif I was told to consider an entire new unit which could cost $1500 to $2000. I have an old York Stellar Plus, H1CH024 thru H1CH048 Hermetic Compressor, Split-System Cooling 2 to 4 ton.

 

Any suggestions?

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Guest ahammer48   
Guest ahammer48

Hello

There a little pricey on the fan mtr if U ask me. Shop around. And don't let them scare U with the "we can't guarantee the condenser" stuff. They only have to guarantee the mtr they install.

As far as replacing th unit, thats up to U .How long U gonna stay in the house. etc. Is it worth it to U to replace it? If replacement is right 4 U then don't do the mtr. Sink they money into the new unit.

;)

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jerome8283   
jerome8283

"...the fan starts up very slowly." I was told this is a sign that the fan capacitor is going bad. I will start by replacing it since it's cheap to do so.

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Guest ahammer48   
Guest ahammer48

Hello

Yes it could be a sign that the cap is bad, but they don't go defective too often. When the motor starts is it quiet and smooth(just slow) or is it noisey and rattles? 

Look @ the cap. Do U C any oil on it or around it. Does the shape looked deformed, does the top where the connectors R look like its pushed out. If U answer no to these questions, then most likely the cap is good and its the motor thats going bad.

If you have an anolog multimeter(the kind with a needle pointer, not a digital display) U can test the cap very easily. Turn off all power to the unit and let it sit awhile. Disconnect all wires to the cap(making sure U make a diagram as to where they should go back). If you have a 2 in 1 cap,( there pretty big and will have (3) terminals on it)  One teminal will be marked with a C, one will say FAN and the last 1 will say COMP(compressor) Ur only interested in the C and fan terminal

Take a screwdriver and ground 1 teminal  of the cap to the metal of the unit. That will eliminate any stored voltage that might have been in the cap. Now set UR meter to ohms and put one test lead on one cap connector and the other lead on the other connector. Ur meter needle should go to infinity(looks like an 8 laying on its side) and then drop back to 0. Reverse Ur leads and to the same thing again. If again the needle rises and then drops back down the cap is good. If the needle dosen't move the cap is open. If the needle rises and stays @ infinity the cap is shorted.

I know caps are cheap. But if U don't have a meter and the cap LOOKS normal, use the money to replace the motor instead.

Hope that helps:)

P.S.--- I'm a YORK factory tech

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jerome8283   
jerome8283

Thanks ahammer48.

This is very helpful. I went ahead and made the decision today to purchase a cap. I figured since they are so cheap I would start here. Based on my research on this, I cannot and have not ruled out the motor. In fact, I just received the cost for a replacement. Visually the cap looks good; at least it did last week. I’m trying to attach some pictures that I took last week. I hope I'll be able to post them all. I realize my unit is very old and I'm prepared to replace it but I do wish to go through replacing the cap and/or motor first.

attachment.php?attachmentid=2450&d=1152671508

attachment.php?attachmentid=2451&d=1152671549

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jerome8283   
jerome8283

[user=8359]ahammer48[/user] wrote:

Hello

Yes it could be a sign that the cap is bad, but they don't go defective too often. When the motor starts is it quiet and smooth(just slow) or is it noisey and rattles? 

It's noisy and I guess I can call it a rattle.

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