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Samurai Appliance Repair Man's Blog

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The Advanced Schematic Analysis and Troubleshooting training course is now available!

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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At last, your wait is at an end: The Advanced Schematic Analysis and Troubleshooting (ASAT) training course is now open for enrollment!

In the ASAT course, you will delve deeply into sophisticated and esoteric appliance circuit troubleshooting techniques. You'll learn how to use timing charts together with the schematic to troubleshoot problems; how to use Ohm's Law as a powerful troubleshooting tool to give you a clear understanding of how a circuit works; how to troubleshoot deceptive and tricky open neutral problems; and how to troubleshoot appliances with control boards, including multiple control boards and microprocessor boards.

But wait-- incredibly, there's more! You will also put your newly-found schematic reading and troubleshooting skills to the test in a challenging series of schematic exercises where you're given a tech sheet and schematic and then asked a series of quiz questions about them. The quiz is graded instantly.

These schematic exercises are a powerful component of the ASAT course because you get to apply the principles you've learned in the screencasts on different tech sheets and schematics. The exercises use the actual tech sheets from real appliances and cover various brands (Frigidaire, GE, Whirlpool, Samsung, Bosch, and Wolf) and appliance types (washer, stacked laundry, range, dishwasher, dual fuel range, and refrigerator). The idea is not to give you monkey training on specific appliances, but rather to give you practice at applying the troubleshooting principles taught in the course.

The ASAT course requires a solid understanding of electricity, circuits, and troubleshooting, which can be learned from the Fundamentals of Appliance Repair training course or the Basic Electricity Boot Camp (BEBC). The BEBC course is designed for the experienced appliance tech who wants to take the ASAT course but needs the prerequisite thorough training in basic electricity, circuits, and schematics. It is not offered as a stand-alone course, only bundled with the ASAT course.

Click here to enroll in the Advanced Schematic Analysis and Troubleshooting course today!

We've been getting slammed with new enrollments from techs who've been asking for this course as well as techs who are interested in it and want to know more. Here are some of the common questions folks are asking us about the ASAT course:

Q. Will this course help me work on Samsungs, or Bosch, etc??

A. Absolutely! But maybe not for the reason you may think. You will learn troubleshooting principles and techniques that apply to any brand. The point of the ASAT course is not to give you monkey training on specific appliances but rather to teach you advanced technical skills and to give you practice at interpreting schematics and applying the troubleshooting principles taught in the course.

Q. How much about electricity do I need to know to take the ASAT course?

A. You should have a good working understanding of basic electricity and series and parallel circuits and already have some familiarity with reading schematics. You would get a solid foundation in these skills in the Fundamentals of Appliance Repair training course or the Basic Electricity Boot Camp.

Q. I've already taken the Fundamentals course how will the ASAT course help me beyond that?

A. The ASAT course kicks it up to 11 and gives you in-depth instruction on tricky troubleshooting situations that commonly befuddle techs such as how to troubleshoot deceptive and tricky open neutral problems and how to troubleshoot appliances with control boards, including multiple control boards and microprocessor boards.

Q. How long will it take to complete the course?

A. The ASAT course is a combined total of 17 lessons and schematic exercise units.

The lessons consist of 12 Samurai-original presentation videos, almost 5 hours of viewing time, some you'll need to watch more than once. Each lesson has a quiz where you'll apply what you've learned in the presentation.

In addition, the course has 6 schematic exercises (more may be added over time) where you're given a tech sheet or service manual and asked a series of questions requiring you to read the schematics and interpret specifications in various troubleshooting scenarios.

How long will all this take? That's up to you! The course is entirely self-paced and the time it takes for you to complete it depends on how much you work at it. And you can start the course any time you like after you enroll.

Q. How long will I have access to the course?

A. As with all Samurai Tech Academy courses, you have lifetime access to any course you are enrolled in, even after you graduate! This includes access to any new material added to the courses (as we frequently do) to keep them fresh and up to date.

Q. How much is the tuition for the ASAT course?

A. Tuition is $350 but we're offering a 10% discount coupon good through the end of the month. Just enter ASATLAUNCH in the coupon slot on the enroll page. BTW, that coupon is good for 10% off any of our courses and it expires at the end of this month so...

Click here to enroll in the Advanced Schematic Analysis and Troubleshooting course today!

If you have any other questions, post 'em here or contact me through the Academy's contact form.


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