Jump to content


Use this Search Box to Find Appliance Repair Help Now
Need help finding your model number?
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!


FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Welcome to Appliantology.org, the Web's Premiere Appliance Repair Resource for DIYers!

The world-famous Samurai Appliance Repair Forums


You can post a question and get repair help for FREE! Click here to get started.


Already a member of the Appliantology Academy? Just sign in with your username and password in the upper right-hand corner of the screen.

 


Samurai Appliance Repair Man's Blog



How to manually cycle the GE WR30X10093 icemaker

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Refrigerator Repair, Icemaker Repair 05 August 2013 · 2,661 views
GE, icemaker, test, harvest and 2 more...
A useful and handy diagnostic technique when working on an ice maker problem is to manually initiate a harvest cycle to see with the ice maker will or will not do. Here's how to manually cycle the GE WR30X10093 ice maker:


Power On Diagnostics
When the icemaker is first connected to power and if thermistor temperature is 50°F (10°C) or higher,
the control will perform a Power On test before entering the freeze cycle.
The test consists of the following:
• Turn on the motor until it reaches home the next time.
• Turn on the water valve for 1/2 second.
• Tum on the heater for 1/2 second.
• Verify that the feeler arm was in the "in" and then in the "out" position.
• Verify that the motor was not in the home position and then in the home position.
• Verify that the motor does not remain on after being turned off.
• Proceed to the freeze cycle.
Note:The power on test will only add 1/2 second of water, which will not overflow the mold with a normal fill,
but may cause a small cube when the refrigerator is first started.
If the temperature is below 50°F (10°C), the control will power up normally.
If in the home position, the control will enter the freeze cycle.
If the motor is not home, the control will enter the harvest cycle but bypass water fill to avoid overfilling the mold.

Service Diagnostics
During the first 15 seconds that power is first applied to the icemaker,
the Service Diagnostic Test mode may be entered.
The service mode is entered by pushing the feeler arm from the "out" position to the "in" position
and back again 3 times and only 3 times within 15 seconds.
Note: If the icemaker has already started a harvest cycle and the arm is moving,
it may be impossible to properly move the arm and enter the service mode without allowing it to reset and powering up again.
The service diagnostic mode consists of a harvest cycle followed by a water fill.
The harvest cycle is entered immediately, regardless of icemaker temperature or arm position.
While in the harvest cycle in the service mode, the heater will remain on for a minimum of 20 seconds.
The water fill cycle will initiate the first fill (5.1 seconds) without waiting for the mold to "prechill".
Only one water fill occurs during the service mode, whether the thermistor has reached 39.2°F (4°C) or not.
The icemaker will exit the service diagnostic test on its own and enter the normal freeze cycle.



If the ice maker won't do the manual harvest, replace it. Here's the replacement you need: http://www.repaircli...0X10093/1399596


Source: how do you cycle test the WR30X10093 icemaker


Installing the foamed-in-place refrigerator door gaskets used on some Whirlpool and Kitchenaid models: A War Story

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Refrigerator Repair 04 August 2013 · 1,157 views
refrigerator, gaskets and 4 more...
Brother Willie shares his battle-scarred experience with replacing these types of refrigerator door gaskets. To summarize in a word: DON'T. Or, if you must because you're a professional Appliantologist, make sure you charge a lot for the job.

Sounds like you have a FIP, (Foamed-In-Place), door liner. I've only had to replace a door gasket on a FIP door one time and probably will not every do it again.

You have to cut the old gasket in four places, (in the middle on each side), and carefully pull the gasket lip straight out from under the plastic liner, being careful not to pull up and break the liner away from the foam.

They you have to make sure the channel is clear of any remaining foam particles with a putty knife about 1/2" in all the way around.

Then the you have to get the new gasket installed, this was the nightmare part. Says to insert opposite diagonal corners first then other two diagonal corners. First two-no problem, third corner-no problem, forth corner - OHHH!!!!! What B!TCH!!!!! It was a real fight to get it to stretch out enough without tearing the gasket to get it over and under the lips of the liner.



But Brothers PDuff and JJ Surfer offer these consoling words of wisdom:

Concur with Brother Willie on the gasket replacement. Attempt only as a last resort. I think if you follow the instruction sheets on those they want you to remove the door to replace the gasket.

FIP gasket aren't that bad to do. The replacement gaskets have a had plastic edge that snaps into channel between liner and door panel. After removing the old gaskets I put silicone caulking where the new gasket will snap into the liner. Two problems with FIP door gasket replacement:
1. If you don't put adhesive the gasket tend to slide, especially on the hinge side where the door cams constantly slide up and down
2. The gaskets often come in too small and need to be stretched, I've done plenty that go on no problem and I have had a lot that seem about 1/4 too short.
Basically the original gaskets are better and should only be changed if there are significant tears, splits or missing magnets.



Source: Kitchenaid fridge. KBRC36FKS02. Sporadic temp problems


Reading wiring diagrams: How the Defrost Cycle works in a Danby refrigerator

Danby, defrost, circuit, diagram and 2 more...
Brother Reg elegantly steps us through the circuit diagram for this one.

When the Defrost cycle starts (Timer Motor pauses),
the Neutral goes through the Defrost Heater, Defrost Thermostat, and Thermal Fuse to Line.
Whenever the Defrost Thermostat "opens",
the Neutral still goes through the Defrost Heater, but now travels through the Timer Motor
and "seeks" the Line through the Compressor.(and Overload).
Motor resumes, but since the Motor is of a "high" resistance, the Heater hardly heats anymore,
until the Timer completes it's "Defrost timing", and then it switches the Neutral back to itself and to the Compressor.
If any of those parts aren't working, the Motor may not run at the specific time.


Posted Image



Source: Help Me Read This Wiring Diagram


Electrolux and Frigidaire Refrigerator Water Valve Diode in Harnesses by Model and Ice Maker Style

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Refrigerator Repair, Icemaker Repair 23 June 2013 · 1,038 views
Electroluc, Frigidaire and 6 more...

I noticed I never could seem to find them on the part breakdown, so I made a list. Here ya go!


Electrolux and Frigidaire Refrigerator Water Valve Diode in Harnesses by Model and Ice
Maker Style.

Refrigerator Style Ice Maker Type Part Number
Side X Side Crescent Cube 5303918287
French Door Finger Evaporator 242102101
French Door Flex Tray 242119101
On French Door models it doesn't matter if there is a crescent cube ice maker in the
freezer section or not, order the diode according to the style of the ice maker that's in
the fresh food section.

http://appliantology...guration-guide/



Source: VALVE ASSY HELP


Rigging and using a compressor test cord to manually operate a compressor

Posted by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, in Refrigerator Repair 21 June 2013 · 1,440 views
compressor, refrigerator and 1 more...
One of the many things that can make a refrigerator warm up is the compressor is trying but failing to start. You may occasionally hear this type of noise from the back of the refrigerator (starts about 15 seconds in):




This is the sound of your compressor trying, but failing miserably, to start. Best case scenario: Bad compressor start relay. Worst case scenario: open compressor start winding or seized compressor bearing == buy a new refrigerator.

Question: How do you tell which is which?

Answer: Compressor test cord.

Question: What's a compressor test cord and how do I make one?

Answer:


Posted Image

Question: How do you know which is the start, run, and common connection posts on the compressor?

Answer: Use Brother Bobice's procedure for identifying the compressor electrical terminals:

Using a good multimeter set on ohms, remove the compressor terminal cover with the unit off.

Touch one lead (of the meter) to one terminal and the other lead (of the meter) to one other terminal and record your reading . Lets call these terminals (A) and (B). The remaining terminal lets call ©

So for example A-B=7 Ohms

Now lets read A-C and record. Lets say 5 Ohms

Now lets read C-B and record. Lets say 12 Ohms

Now lets add all the A’s= 12 Ohms

Now lets add all the B’s=19 Ohms

Now lets add all the C’s=17 Ohms

The highest reading will be the “Start” winding

The next highest reading will be the “Run” winding

The lowest reading will be the “Common” winding

Therefore B= “Start”

The next is C=”Run”

The remaining terminal A= “Common”








Like - Plus - Connect - View

Facebook-icon50x50.png google-plus-icon-50x50.png YouTube-icon50x50.png

Find Parts & Diagrams Here

Looking for Appliance Parts? Enter your model number, part number, or even a part description and find it here. 365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

Search My Blog

Latest Visitors

Random Album Image

Big Honkin' Dragonfly

40 user(s) viewing

0 members, 38 guests, 0 anonymous users


Bing (1), Google (1)


FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Use the Appliantology Parts Finder to Get What You Need!
Enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

Your Sometimes-Lucid Host:
Samurai Appliance Repair Man
"If I can't help you fix your appliance and make you 100% satisfied, I will come to your home and slice open my belly,
spilling my steaming entrails onto your floor."

The Appliance Guru | AppliancePartsResource.com | Samurai's Blog

Real Time Analytics