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Samurai Appliance Repair Man's Blog

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Replacing the Fuse on the Main Control Board of an LG Refrigerator

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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This LG refrigerator was DOA- warm inside, no compressor operation, no lights, no nuttin'. Found a blown fuse on the main control board. What took out the fuse: bad board or just a spike on the power line? I show how to check for that. 

The fuses on these LG boards are soldered in and not easily replaceable. But a new fuse can be installed and I show how to do that without even having to remove the board, while it's still installed in the refrigerator. 

Learn appliance repair at http://mastersamuraitech.com

 



15 Comments


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Good work around for a somewhat expensive board. Take out the part price, charge for a "control board repair" and make more money and a fcc. I'd like to see more of these component level repairs come around to our industry. They've been doing it for 100 years in tv's and radios and I believe it's going to be the next step with nla's and overpriced boards. 

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Where did you get the fuse kit?

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Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Posted

8 hours ago, john63 said:

Those are nice, John, and would be a "snap" repair but it looks like the flared out edges make for a larger footprint. I don't know if there would have been enough room for them in this case. Do you ever have to modify the clip holder to get it to fit?

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Budget Appliance Repair

Posted

21 hours ago, Samurai Appliance Repair Man said:

Those are nice, John, and would be a "snap" repair but it looks like the flared out edges make for a larger footprint. I don't know if there would have been enough room for them in this case. Do you ever have to modify the clip holder to get it to fit?

I was thinking the same think when I first looked at them, but then thought, NO the flared end goes up to protect the new fuse that is going to sit up above the board from side contact, (hopefully nothing too tall and close to fuse or it seem it might still be a problem).

Nice little connector device, Never seen or heard of that before!

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Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Posted

Good observation, Willie, thanks. 

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Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Posted

On July 20, 2016 at 11:37 PM, AlboGator said:

Good work around for a somewhat expensive board. Take out the part price, charge for a "control board repair" and make more money and a fcc. I'd like to see more of these component level repairs come around to our industry. They've been doing it for 100 years in tv's and radios and I believe it's going to be the next step with nla's and overpriced boards. 

Fuses and visibly leaking capacitors are two easy things to replace-- they're easy in the sense that it's easy to determine that they're bad. But, unlike TV and radio, the resolution (level of detail) of repairs we can do beyond these two easy ones quickly drops off because we're usually not given detailed schematics of the circuit board. In addition to the schematic, troubleshooting electronic circuits usually also requires a signal generator and oscilloscope. And the repair is usually done at a soldering station. For example, it would be practically impossible to troubleshoot a DC logic circuit to identify and IC chip with a defective binary NAND gate without those information and equipment. 

But even if we get the low hanging fruit, like fuses and leaky caps, that's still a significant percentage of possible repairs. It's fun and saves the customer a wad of cash = loyal customers and good reviews. 

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But even if we get the low hanging fruit, like fuses and leaky caps, that's still a significant percentage of possible repairs. It's fun and saves the customer a wad of cash = loyal customers and good reviews. 

Egg zactly. Don't forget relays. I agree that it's fun and looks impressive even if it's just the basic components. Communication circuits are a whole different story though.

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Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Posted

8 minutes ago, AlboGator said:

Don't forget relays

Yes, relays! Easy to diagnose and replace. 

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On 7/21/2016 at 9:51 AM, Samurai Appliance Repair Man said:

Those are nice, John, and would be a "snap" repair but it looks like the flared out edges make for a larger footprint. I don't know if there would have been enough room for them in this case. Do you ever have to modify the clip holder to get it to fit?

Yes Scott---can be folded/cut with scissors or removed.

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Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Posted

That's awesome! Thanks so much for sharing that, John! Makes this repair even easier. :)

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nice John I am picking up some of those piggy back fuse clips myself for onsite repairs.  I have run into whirlpool dryer control boards that have had some solder joints that came apart in several different model #'s of their dryers. Seems to be a common thing with certain whirlpool dryer boards. I just re solder  then plug and play and the customer is ecststic and happy it costs less than replacing and waiting for a new control board.  Once you can perfect your FCC you never go back.:smileymoon:.  They actually only sell  the buss fuse holders without  the insulated board that seperates the two fuses.  The picture of the fuse holder you see is not the one that they sell. They sell just 2 separate pieces for each fuse end connection that will just clip on each end of the existing fuse and then you just pop in a new fuse over the top of the bad existing fuse that is permanently soldered in.

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Oh hell yes. I think I love all you guys!

Quick

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Lighthouse

Posted (edited)

On 7/21/2016 at 12:36 AM, john63 said:

Tried to find these but was able to get the link to show them. Do you have another supplier for them or a link to these fuses?

Have a part number?

Edited by Lighthouse

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